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Ultimate Guide to Maximizing Your 401(k)

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

You’re probably familiar with the basics of a 401(k).

You know that it’s a retirement account and that it’s offered by your employer. You know that you can contribute a percentage of your salary and that you get tax breaks on those contributions. And you know that your employer may offer some type of matching contribution.

But beyond the basics, you may have some confusion about exactly how your 401(k) works and what you should be doing to maximize its benefits.

That’s what this guide is going to show you. We’ll tell you everything you need to know in order to maximize your 401(k) contributions.

The 4 Types of 401(k) Contributions You Need to Understand

When it comes to maximizing your 401(k), nothing you do will be more important than maximizing your contributions.

Because while most investment advice focuses on how to build the perfect portfolio, the truth is that your savings rate is much more important than the investments you choose. Especially when you’re just starting out, the simple act of saving more money is far and away the most effective way to accelerate your path toward financial independence.

There are four different ways to contribute to your 401(k), and understanding how each one works will allow you to combine them in the most efficient way possible, adding more money to your 401(k) and getting you that much closer to retirement.

1. Employee Contributions

Employee contributions are the only type of 401(k) contribution that you have full control over and are likely to be the biggest source of your 401(k) funds.

Employee contributions are the contributions that you personally make to your 401(k). They’re typically set up as a percentage of your salary and are deducted directly from your paycheck.

For example, let’s say that you are paid $3,000 every two weeks. If you decide to contribute 5% of your salary to your 401(k), then $150 will be taken out of each paycheck and deposited directly into your 401(k).

There are two different types of employee contributions you can make to your 401(k), each with a different set of tax benefits:

  1. Traditional contributions – Traditional contributions are tax-deductible in the year you make the contribution, grow tax-free while inside the 401(k), and are taxed as ordinary income when you withdraw the money in retirement. This is just like a traditional IRA. All 401(k)s allow you to make traditional contributions, and in most cases your contributions will default to traditional unless you choose otherwise.
  2. Roth contributions – Roth contributions are NOT tax-deductible in the year you make the contribution, but they grow tax-free while inside the 401(k) and the money is tax-free when you withdraw it in retirement. This is just like a Roth IRA. Not all 401(k)s allow you to make Roth contributions.

For more on whether you should make traditional or Roth contributions, you can refer to the following guide that’s specific to IRAs but largely applies to 401(k)s as well: Guide to Choosing the Right IRA: Traditional or Roth?

Maximum personal contributions

The IRS sets limits on how much money you can personally contribute to your 401(k) in a given year. For 2017, employee contributions are capped at $18,000, or $24,000 if you’re age 50 or older. In subsequent sections we’ll talk about how much you should be contributing in order to maximize these contributions.

2. Employer Matching Contributions

Many employers match your contributions up to a certain point, meaning that they contribute additional money to your 401(k) each time you make a contribution.

Employer matching contributions are only somewhat in your control. You can’t control whether your employer offers a match or the type of match they offer, but you can control how effectively you take advantage of the match they do offer.

Taking full advantage of your employer match is one of the most important parts of maximizing your 401(k). Skip ahead to this section to learn more on how to maximize your employer match.

3. Employer Non-Matching Contributions

Non-matching 401(k) contributions are contributions your employer makes to your 401(k) regardless of how much you contribute. Some companies offer this type of contribution in addition to, or in lieu of, regular matching contributions.

For example, your employer might contribute 5% of your salary to your 401(k) no matter what. Or they might make a variable contribution based on the company’s annual profits.

It’s important to note that these contributions are not within your control. Your employer either makes them or not, no matter what you do.

However, they can certainly affect how much you need to save for retirement, since more money from your employer may mean that you don’t personally have to save as much. Or they could be viewed as additional free savings that help you reach financial independence even sooner.

4. Non-Roth After-Tax Contributions

This last type of 401(k) contribution is rare. Many 401(k) plans don’t even allow this type of contribution, and even when they do, these contributions are rarely utilized.

The big catch is again that most 401(k) plans don’t allow these contributions. You can refer to your 401(k)’s summary plan description to see if it does.

And even if they are allowed, it typically only makes sense to take advantage of them if you’re already maxing out all of the other retirement accounts available to you.

But if you are maxing out those other accounts, you want to save more, and your 401(k) allows these contributions, they can be a powerful way to get even more out of your 401(k).

Here’s how they work:

Non-Roth after-tax 401(k) contributions are sort of a hybrid between Roth and traditional contributions. They are not tax-deductible, like Roth contributions, which means they are taxed first and then the remaining money is what is contributed to your account. The money grows tax-free while inside the 401(k), but the earnings are taxed as ordinary income when they are withdrawn. The contributions themselves are not taxed again.

A quick example to illustrate how the taxation works:

  • You make $10,000 of non-Roth after-tax contributions to your 401(k). You are not allowed to deduct these contributions for tax purposes.
  • Over the years, that $10,000 grows to $15,000 due to investment performance.
  • When you withdraw this money, the $10,000 that is due to contributions is not taxed. But the $5,000 that is due to investment returns — your earnings — is taxed as ordinary income.

This hybrid taxation means that on their own non-Roth after-tax 401(k) contributions are typically not as effective as either pure traditional or Roth contributions.

But they can be uniquely valuable in two big ways:

  1. You can make non-Roth after-tax contributions IN ADDITION to the $18,000 annual limit on regular employee contributions, giving you the opportunity to save even more money. They are only subject to the $54,000 annual limit that combines all employee and employer contributions made to a 401(k)..
  2. These contributions can be rolled over into a Roth IRA, when you leave your company or even while you’re still working there. And once the money is in a Roth IRA, the entire balance, including the earnings, grows completely tax-free. This contribution rollover process has been coined the Mega Backdoor Roth IRA, and it can be an effective way for high-income earners to stash a significant amount of tax-free money for retirement.

How to Maximize Your 401(k) Employer Match

With an understanding of the types of 401(k) contributions available to you, it’s time to start maximizing them. And the very first step is making sure you’re taking full advantage of your employer match.

Simply put, your 401(k) employer match is almost always the best investment return available to you. Because with every dollar you contribute up to the full match, you typically get an immediate 25%-100% return.

You won’t find that kind of deal almost anywhere else.

Here’s everything you need to know about understanding how your employer match works and how to take full advantage of it.

How a 401(k) Employer Match Works

While every 401(k) matching program is different, and you’ll learn how to find the details of your program below, a fairly typical employer match looks like this:

  • Your employer matches 100% of your contribution up to 3% of your salary.
  • Your employer also matches 50% of your contribution above 3% of your salary, up to 5% of your salary.
  • Your employer does not match contributions above 5% of your salary.

To see how this works with real numbers, let’s say that you make $3,000 per paycheck and that you contribute 10% of your salary to your 401(k). That means that $300 of your own money is deposited into your 401(k) as an employee contribution every time you receive a paycheck, and your employer matching contribution breaks down like this:

  1. The first 3% of your contribution, or $90 per paycheck, is matched at 100%, meaning that your employer contributes an additional $90 on top of your contribution.
  2. The next 2% of your contribution, or $60 per paycheck, is matched at 50%, meaning that your employer contributes an additional $30 on top of your contribution.
  3. The next 5% of your contribution is not matched.

All told, in this example, your employer contributes an extra 4% of your salary to your 401(k) as long as you contribute at least 5% of your salary. That’s an immediate 80% return on investment.

That’s why it’s so important to take full advantage of your 401(k). There’s really no other investment that provides such an easy, immediate, and high return.

How to Find Your 401(k) Employer Matching Program

On a personal level, taking full advantage of your 401(k) employer match is simply a matter of contributing at least the maximum percent of salary that your employer is willing to match. In the example above that would be 5%, but the actual amount varies from plan to plan.

So your job is to find out exactly how your 401(k) employer matching program works, and the good news is that it shouldn’t be too hard.

There are two main pieces of information you’re looking for:

  1. The maximum contribution percentage your employer will match – This is the amount of money you’d need to contribute in order to get the full match. For example, your employer might match your contribution up to 5% of your salary as in the example above, or it could be 3%, 12%, or any other percentage. Whatever this maximum percentage is, you’ll want to do what you can to contribute at least that amount so that you get the full match.
  2. The matching percentage – Your employer might match 100% of your contribution, or they may only match 50%, or 25%, or some combination of all of the above, and this has a big effect on the amount of money you actually receive. For example, two companies might both match up to 5% of your salary, but one might match 100% of that contribution, and one might only match 25% of it. Both are good deals, but one is four times as valuable.

With those two pieces of information in hand, you’ll know how much you need to contribute in order to get the full match and how much extra money you’ll be getting each time you make that contribution.

As for where to find this information, the best and most definitive source is your 401(k)’s summary plan description, which is a long document that details all the ins and outs of your plan. This is a great resource for all sorts of information about your 401(k), but you can specifically look for the word “match” to find the details on your employer matching program.

And if you have any trouble either finding the information or understanding it, you can reach out to your human resources representative for help. You should be able to find their contact information in the summary plan description.

Two Big Pitfalls to Avoid When Maximizing Your 401(k) Employer Match

Your 401(k) employer match is almost always a good deal, but there are two pitfalls to watch out for: vesting and front-loading contributions. Both of these could either diminish the value of your employer match or cause you to miss out on getting the full match.

Pitfall #1: Vesting

Clock time deadline

Employer contributions to your 401(k) plan, including matching contributions, may be subject to something called a vesting schedule.

A vesting schedule means that those employer contributions are not 100% yours right away. Instead, they become yours over time as you accumulate years of service with the company. If you leave before your employer contributions are fully vested, you will only get to take some of that money with you.

For example, a common vesting schedule gives you an additional 20% ownership over your 401(k) employer contributions for each year you stay with the company. If you leave before one year, you will not get to keep any of those employer contributions. If you leave after one year, you will get to keep 20% of the employer contributions and the earnings they’ve accumulated. After two years it will be 40%, and so on until you’ve earned the right to keep 100% of that money after five years with the company.

Three things to know about vesting:

  1. Employee contributions are never subject to a vesting schedule. Every dollar you contribute and every dollar that money earns is always 100% yours, no matter how long you stay with your company. Only employer contributions are subject to vesting schedules.
  2. Not all companies have a vesting schedule. In some cases you might be immediately 100% vested in all employer contributions.
  3. There is a single vesting clock for all employer contributions. In the example above, all employer contributions will be 100% vested once you’ve been with the company for five years, even those that were made just weeks earlier. You are not subject to a new vesting period with each individual employer contribution.

A vesting schedule can decrease the value of your employer match. A 100% match is great, but a 100% match that takes five years to get the full benefit of is not quite as great.

Still, in most cases it makes sense to take full advantage of your employer match, even if it’s subject to a vesting schedule. And the reasoning is simply that the worst-case scenario is that you leave your job before any of those employer contributions vest, in which case your 401(k) would have acted just like any other retirement account available to you, none of which offer any opportunity to get a matching contribution.

However, there are situations in which a vesting schedule might make it better to prioritize other retirement accounts before your 401(k). In some cases, your 401(k) employer contributions might be 0% vested until you’ve been with the company for three years, at which point they will become 100% vested. If you anticipate leaving your current employer within the next couple of years, and if your 401(k) is burdened with high costs, you may be better off prioritizing an IRA or other retirement account first.

You may also want to consider your vesting schedule before quitting or changing jobs. It certainly shouldn’t be the primary factor you consider, but if you’re close to having a significant portion of your 401(k) vest, it may be worth waiting just a little bit longer to make your move.

You can find all the details on your 401(k) vesting schedule in your summary plan description. And again you can reach out to your human resources representative if you have any questions.

Pitfall #2: Front-Loading Contributions

In most cases, it makes sense to put as much money into your savings and investments as soon as possible. The sooner it’s contributed, the more time it has to compound its returns and earn you even more money.

But the rules are different if you’re trying to max out your 401(k) employer match.

The reason is that most employers apply their maximum match on a per-paycheck basis. That is, if your employer only matches up to 5% of your salary, what they’re really saying is that they will only match up to 5% of each paycheck.

For a simple example, let’s say that you’re paid $18,000 twice per month. So over the course of an entire year, you make $432,000.

In theory, you could max out your annual allowed 401(k) contribution with your very first paycheck of the year. Simply contribute 100% of your salary for that one paycheck, and you’re done.

The problem is that you would only get the match on that one single paycheck. If your employer matches up to 5% of your salary, then they would match 5% of that $18,000 paycheck, or $900. The next 23 paychecks of the year wouldn’t get any match because you weren’t contributing anything. And since you were eligible to get a 5%, $900 matching contribution with each paycheck, that means you’d be missing out on $20,700.

Now, most people aren’t earning $18,000 per paycheck, so the stakes aren’t quite that high. But the principle remains the same.

In order to get the full benefit of your employer match, you need to set up your 401(k) contributions so that you’re contributing at least the full matching percentage every single paycheck. You may be able to front-load your contributions to a certain extent, but you want to make sure that you stay far enough below the annual $18,000 limit to get the full match with every paycheck.

Now, some companies will actually make an extra contribution at the end of the year to make up the difference if you contributed enough to get the full match but accidentally missed out on a few paychecks. You can find out if your company offers that benefit in your 401(k)’s summary plan description.

But in most cases you’ll need to spread your contributions out over the entire year in order to get the full benefit of your employer match.

When to Contribute More Than Is Needed for Your Employer Match

Maxing out your 401(k) employer match is a great start, but there’s almost always room to contribute more.

Using the example from above, the person with the $3,000 per-paycheck salary would max out his or her employer match with a 5% contribution. That’s $150 per paycheck. Assuming 26 paychecks per year, that individual would personally contribute $3,900 to his or her 401(k) over the course of a year with that 5% contribution.

And given that the maximum annual contribution for 2017 is $18,000 ($24,000 if you’re 50+), he or she would still be eligible to contribute an additional $14,100 per year. In fact, this individual would have to set his or her 401(k) contribution to just over 23% in order to make that full $18,000 annual contribution.

3 big questions to answer:

  1. Do you need to contribute more in order to reach your personal goals?
  2. Can you afford to contribute more right now?
  3. If the answer is yes to both #1 and #2, should you be making additional contributions to your 401(k) beyond the employer match, or should you be prioritizing other retirement accounts?

Questions #1 and #2 are beyond the scope of this guide, but you can get a sense of your required retirement savings here and here.

Question #3 is what we’ll address here. If you’ve already maxed out your employer match and you want to save more money for retirement, should you prioritize your 401(k) or other retirement accounts?

Let’s dive in.

What Other Retirement Accounts Are Available to You?

Your 401(k) is almost never the only retirement account available to you. Here are the other major options you might have.

IRA

An IRA is a retirement account that you set up on your own, outside of work. You can contribute up to $5,500 per year ($6,500 if you’re 50+), and just like with the 401(k) there are two different types:

  1. Traditional IRA – You get a tax deduction on your contributions, your money grows tax-free inside the account, and your withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income in retirement.
  2. Roth IRA – You do not get a tax deduction on your contributions, but your money grows tax-free and can be withdrawn tax-free in retirement.

You can read more about making the decision between using a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA here: Guide to Choosing the Right IRA: Traditional or Roth?

The big benefit of IRAs is that you have full control over the investment company you use, and therefore the investments you choose and the fees you pay. While some 401(k)s force you to choose between a small number of high-cost investments, IRAs give you a lot more freedom to choose better investments.

The only catch is that there are income limits that may prevent you from being allowed to contribute to an IRA or to deduct your contributions for tax purposes. If you earn more than those limits, an IRA may not be an option for you.

Health Savings Account

Health savings accounts, or HSAs, were designed to be used for medical expenses, but they can also function as a high-powered retirement account.

In fact, health savings accounts are the only investment accounts that offer a triple tax break:

  1. Your contributions are deductible.
  2. Your money grows tax-free inside the account.
  3. You can withdraw the money tax-free for qualified medical expenses.

On top of that, many HSAs allow you to invest the money, your balance rolls over year to year, and as long as you keep good records, you can actually reimburse yourself down the line for medical expenses that occurred years ago.

Put all that together with the fact that you will almost certainly have medical expenses in retirement, and HSAs are one of the most powerful retirement tools available to you.

The catch is that you have to be participating in a qualifying high-deductible health plan, which generally means a minimum annual deductible of $1,300 for individual coverage and $2,600 for family coverage.

If you’re eligible though, you can contribute up to $3,400 if you are the only individual covered by such a plan, or up to $6,750 if you have family coverage.

Backdoor Roth IRA

If you’re not eligible to contribute to an IRA directly, you might want to consider something called a Backdoor Roth IRA.

The Backdoor Roth IRA takes advantage of two rules that, when combined, can allow you to contribute to a Roth IRA even if you make too much for a regular contribution:

  1. You are always allowed to make non-deductible traditional IRA contributions, up to the annual $5,500 limit, no matter how much you make.
  2. You are also allowed to convert money from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA at any time, no matter how much you make.

When you put those together, high-earners could make non-deductible contributions to a traditional IRA, and shortly after convert that money to a Roth IRA. From that point forward the money will grow completely tax-free.

There are some potential pitfalls, and you can review all the details here. But if you are otherwise ineligible to make IRA contributions, this is a good option to have in your back pocket.

Taxable Investment Account

While dedicated retirement accounts offer the biggest tax breaks, there are plenty of tax-efficient ways to invest within a regular taxable investment account as well.

These accounts can be especially helpful for nearer term goals, since your money isn’t locked away until retirement age, or for money you’d like to invest after maxing out your dedicated retirement accounts.

How to Decide Between Additional 401(K) Contributions and Other Retirement Accounts

With those options in hand, how do you decide whether to make additional 401(k) contributions, beyond the amount needed to max out the employer match, or to contribute that money to other accounts?

There are a few big factors to consider:

  • Eligibility – If you’re not eligible to contribute to an IRA or HSA, a 401(k) might be your best option by default.
  • Costs – Cost is the single best predictor of future investment returns, with lower cost investments leading to higher returns. You’ll want to prioritize accounts that allow you to minimize the fees you pay.
  • Investment options – You should prioritize accounts that allow you to implement your preferred asset allocation, again with good, low-cost funds.
  • Convenience – All else being equal, having fewer accounts spread across fewer companies will make your life easier.

With those factors in mind, here’s a reasonable guide for making the decision:

  1. Max out your employer match before contributing to other accounts.
  2. If your 401(k) offers low fees and investments that fit your desired portfolio, you can keep things simple by prioritizing additional contributions there first. This allows you to work with one account, at least for a little while, instead of several.
  3. If your 401(k) is high-cost, or if you’ve already maxed out your 401(k), a health savings account may be the next best place to look. If you can pay for your medical expenses with other money, allowing this account to stay invested and grow for the long term, that triple tax break is hard to beat.
  4. An IRA is likely your next best option. You can review this guide for a full breakdown of the traditional versus Roth debate.
  5. If you’re not eligible for a direct IRA contribution, you should consider a Backdoor Roth IRA.
  6. If you maxed out your other retirement accounts because your 401(k) is high-cost, now is probably the time to go back. While there are some circumstances in which incredibly high fees might make a taxable investment account a better deal, in most cases the tax breaks offered by a 401(k) will outweigh any difference in cost.
  7. Once those retirement accounts are maxed out, you can invest additional money in a regular taxable investment account.

The Bottom Line: Maximize Your 401(k)

A 401(k) is a powerful tool if you know how to use it. The tax breaks make it easier to save more and earn more than in a regular investment account, and the potential for an employer match is unlike any opportunity offered by any other retirement account.

The key is in understanding your 401(k)’s specific opportunities and how to take maximum advantage of them. If you can do that, you may find yourself a lot closer to financial independence than you thought.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Matt Becker
Matt Becker |

Matt Becker is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Matt here

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Millennials Have More Appetite for Stocks Than Reports Suggest

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

millennial retirement savings
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Are millennials afraid of the stock market? This cohort came of age at the height of the Great Recession, and some recent media reports suggest that this has made young adults more reluctant to put their money into the markets.

A new analysis from MagnifyMoney, however, shows that millennials aren’t exactly allergic to “risky” investments such as stocks. We examined 20 years of workplace savings account data from the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances and compared millennials’ investing habits with prior generations of young savers.

Key findings

  • In 2016, millennials had 60.3% of retirement accounts like IRAs and workplace savings accounts like 401(k) plans allocated to stocks or stock funds. This means millennials have 8 percentage points more of their retirement account funds invested in stocks than those 53 and older — the widest gap since 2001.
  • In general, exposure to stocks (equities) has trended downward over the past 20 years. In 1998, all generations had an average of at least 60% of their workplace retirement savings in stocks and stock funds. In 2016, millennials were the only age group who allocated more than 60% of retirement assets to stocks and stock funds.
  • How investors view their tendencies and what they actually do can be two different things. Some millennials claiming they are risk-averse (and thus claim they don’t invest in stocks) may unknowingly own stocks through target date funds (TDFs) and other multi-asset class investments in their retirement plan.

Millennials’ stock-heavy portfolios in line with conventional advice to young investors

Overall, millennials have more of their retirement funds invested in stocks and stock funds than older savers. Here’s a look at the allocation of retirement account assets across millennials (ages 35 and younger), Generation Xers (ages 35 to 51) and baby boomers (ages 51 and over).

In 2016, millennials had, on average, 60.3% of their retirement savings in stocks and stock funds, compared with just 53% for Generation Xers and 52.3% for baby boomers.

This trend of millennials allocating a larger portion of savings to higher-risk or more volatile assets such as stocks is actually in line with conventional retirement planning advice. Younger workers are advised to be more aggressive investors — with decades left to save and weather market ups and downs, they can afford to front-load risk (and reward) today.

Older generations, on the other hand, are advised to allocate retirement funds to less volatile assets as they get closer to retirement age. Baby boomers, in particular, might be planning to live off of retirement savings soon — or might already be relying on those savings. So it’s important to shield retirement savings from high-risk and volatile investments.

Across age groups, today’s investors are choosing stocks less

Overall, this analysis shows that today’s investors are less likely to have a large portion of retirement savings allocated to stocks and stock funds. Here’s a chart that compares the percentage of retirement savings allocated to stocks among age groups, over time:

Stock allocations across all three age cohorts show a largely downward trend, with current stock investments among the lowest levels reported.

Two major changes since 1998 may explain these shifts better than differences in generational risk aversion: the decline of workers with pensions and the rise of target date funds.

TDFs are playing a role in “right-sizing” asset allocations based on age, including those of millennials, who have had access to them since the beginning of their saving careers.

Meanwhile, most private-sector workers today only have defined contribution plans (401(k)s), and not defined benefit (DB) plans.

Major market ups and downs also correlate to some of the trends in this graph above, too. Stock allocations rose in the late 1990s, for example, as the dot-com bubble boomed — and fell in 2000 following its burst. Another small dip in stock investing is seen from 2007 to 2010, in line with the Great Recession and following recovery.

How to start investing in stocks

Whatever your age, buying stocks can be a smart way to grow your net worth and build a secure financial future. However, weathering stock market volatility isn’t always easy — and you’ll want to make sure your stocks strategy is in line with the rest of your financial goals.

If you’re interested in adding stocks to your investing or retirement savings strategies, here’s where you can begin.

Learn the stock market lingo. The world of stocks can seem complicated at first, so picking up on common stock terms can help you make sense of options. You should figure out what stock funds and exchange-traded funds are, for example, and know the difference between preferred and common stocks.

Set your stock investing goals. It’s important to make sure you align your stock investments with your bigger goals. Maximizing your 401(k) funds for a retirement that’s 30 years away will call for a much different investing strategy than if you’re investing in short-term savings. If you know what you want to accomplish by investing, you can choose stocks and funds that are most likely to make that happen.

Research stocks and funds. Once you’re aware of the types of stocks, funds and other assets you can buy, you can look for specific shares that you think are a smart buy. You can research how stock prices are set, and how you can evaluate whether a stock is overpriced or undervalued. Keep an eye out for deals you think are good, and figure out which ones would match well to your investing goals.

Review your account allocations. Many investors have a 401(k) or IRA but might not know how their funds are invested within those savings accounts. Revisit your retirement accounts to see if you want to adjust your allocations for new contributions. You might even want to rebalance your portfolio, selling some assets and buying others, to align with your targeted returns (and risk).

Set up a brokerage account. Most investors can’t buy and sell stocks directly — they’ll need a brokerage account to do so. A traditional broker can be an affordable way to get started — just look for one with low fees to ensure that your returns aren’t eaten up by investing costs.

Download an investing app. Downloading an investing app can be a smart and simple way to get started. Some of the best investing apps can help you analyze stocks, trade and manage investments and even find more funds to invest. Robinhood, for example, charges no commission fees on trades. Or try Acorns, where you can link your checking account to round purchases up and invest the change.

Stay cautious when getting started with stocks. No matter how well-researched or experienced an investor you are, no one can predict the future. As a new investor, however, it’s easy to make rookie mistakes that can cost you big. Keep in mind that every investment you make carries a risk of loss, so start investing a little bit to get comfortable while figuring out the right investing strategy for you.

These tips can get you started if you want to invest in stocks, but make sure you aren’t overlooking other ways to invest.

In some cases, stocks won’t be the best way to invest your funds and keep them growing. If you’re stocking away money for a shorter-term goal, you might want to consider a certificate of deposit. And a savings account is an old favorite if you want to safely store emergency funds or keep your funds easily accessible.

Adding stocks to your investing and money management strategy can be a move that pays off big. The U.S. stock market has consistently performed well, and lots of people have grown their wealth and net worth by investing their funds here. Start small and simple, investing what you can afford to each month, and you could see the effects add up over time.

Methodology

MagnifyMoney examined 20 years (1998 to 2016, inclusive) of workplace savings account data from the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) to determine if millennials (young adults ages 35 and under in 2016) are more risk-averse than prior younger savers.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Elyssa Kirkham
Elyssa Kirkham |

Elyssa Kirkham is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Elyssa here

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Retirement

The Average Retirement Savings of Millennials Isn’t Enough

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The Average Retirement Savings of Millennials Isn’t Enough

A new MagnifyMoney analysis of recent Federal Reserve data reveals that millennials aren’t saving enough for retirement. This might not be shocking on its own, but the data also reveals that the gap between what millennials have saved compared with what they should be saving is surprisingly wide.

To set our benchmark, MagnifyMoney used the guideline promoted by retirement industry experts, such as Fidelity, that workers should have roughly two times their annual income in retirement savings by age 35.

We then compared the earnings, savings and ages of millennials as reported in the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances to see whether they are hitting that mark.

Here’s what our dive into the data revealed about millennials’ retirement savings.

Key findings

  • The median 2016 retirement savings level for households headed by 30-somethings was about $23,000, while the median income level was $55,400. This means that typical millennials in their 30s have saved just 41% of their income.
  • Based on that level of income, median households should have saved $112,000, according to a common rule of thumb suggested by retirement plan administrators and financial planners. That’s almost five times more than the actual median savings of $23,000.
  • This shortfall isn’t specific to the current cohort of savers in their 30s (millennials). Prior surveys show a persistent shortfall in retirement savings among 30-somethings in previous generations, too.
  • While high earners are saving slightly more than median or average earners, they still fall short of retirement savings guidelines. Recent data show 30-something households with income at the 90th percentile — $146,000 — have saved roughly 1.1 times their income ($160,000) in retirement accounts when the rule of thumb suggests that figure should be $292,000.

Millennials are 80% behind on retirement savings


Unfortunately, millennials’ retirement saving efforts are far behind the recommended benchmark. The median income for workers in their 30s is $55,700 per year. This puts the retirement saving target at around $111,400 by age 35.

The actual savings are far behind that, however, with the median retirement savings at just $23,000. In fact, a typical millennial has saved only 40% of their annual income at age 35. This is just about one-fifth of the amount they should have saved. (Average retirement savings levels are similarly short).

Median earners in their 30s aren’t saving nearly enough. But perhaps more surprisingly, a better paycheck doesn’t seem to help much, as even high-earning households are coming up short.

High earners save more, but are still behind

High earners do a better job saving for their golden years than their median-earning peers. This makes sense, as higher-income households will have more funds at their disposal that they can use to save.

But even high-income millennials still fall short of the target of saving twice their incomes. Part of that is because earning more results in higher salaries, which also raises the target amount they should save.

In 2016, households earning at the 90th percentile — those earning about $146,000 or more per year — had saved $160,000 so far for retirement. That might seem impressive since it’s nearly seven times the $23,000 median retirement savings balance among their cohort.

But based on their level of income, the retirement savings standard suggests they should have close to $300,000 saved. Yet these high earners are around five years behind on their savings, having saved just 1.1 times their annual salary.

Of course, these numbers won’t reflect every saver’s individual progress. A household that falls in line with the median retirement savings of $23,000 with an annual income of $20,000 might actually be doing OK. Or they might earn $200,000, and be even further behind than most.

Other households might have their retirement savings right on target for their 30s or even be saving more aggressively with the aim of retiring early. Overall, however, it’s safe to say that millennials whose retirement savings are on or ahead of schedule are the exceptions to the undersaving trend.

Millennials’ retirement savings are on par with previous generations’

Millennials are way behind the ideal benchmarks for their retirement savings, and that’s worrying. But do these millennials have it worse than past generations?

We took a look at the historical Federal Reserve data going back to 1998 to find out how millennials’ retirement savings levels compared with previous generations’ savings habits.


As this chart shows, millennials are actually saving better than previous cohorts of 30-somethings. This could reflect the conservative money management attitudes found among many millennials. After coming of age in the Great Recession, this cohort saw the importance of personal fiscal responsibility.

The average retirement savings for millennials in 2016 is $64,000, which is 14% higher than the $56,000 30-somethings’ average retirement savings in 1998 (all figures are in 2016 dollars).

Interestingly enough, millennials are saving more without earning more than previous cohorts — U.S. wages haven’t grown much in that time.

On top of stagnant pay, millennials have also faced historically higher levels of student debt. The average student debt among recent graduates was $39,400, and a typical monthly student loan payment for a millennial is $351. With this student debt, millennials have had fewer discretionary funds they could use to make retirement savings contributions.

The fact that millennials’ savings habits are outpacing previous generations despite these financial obstacles is a promising trend, but it still might not be enough.

The guideline to have twice your salary saved by 35 is, admittedly, an aggressive goal — one that 30-somethings have been falling short of for the past 20 years. But it’s what millennials should be shooting for to ensure a comfortable and financially secure retirement.

How millennials can catch up on retirement savings

If you’re a millennial, you might be wondering how your retirement savings stack up — and if you’re behind, what you can do to make up for lost time.

The first thing to do is figure out where your retirement savings “should” be, according to this guideline. If you’re 30, this will simply be equal to your annual salary; for 35-year-olds, it will be twice that amount.

For every year in between or above, you can simply add on an additional 20% of your annual income. A 38-year-old, for example, should be shooting to have 2.6 times their annual income in retirement savings accounts.

Once you have your number, start planning for retirement and taking steps to catch up. Here are some ways you can start saving more.

  • Take advantage of employer-provided retirement plans. If your employer offers a retirement savings plan, such as a 401(k), it can be an easy and simple way to contribute through your paycheck.
  • Contribute enough to get the full employer match. Many employers will include retirement savings matching in their benefits package. This usually means that they will deposit extra funds into your retirement account to match your own contributions, typically capped at a certain amount. Find the details about your employer plan and contribute at least enough to take advantage of this full match.
  • Open an individual IRA. You don’t need an employer to open a retirement savings account, however. Almost anyone can open an IRA or Roth IRA and start contributing to it on their own.
  • Get debt costs and payments under control. If you have student loans, credit card balances, or other debt, these monthly payments and interest costs will limit your ability to save for retirement. Look for ways you can decrease the costs of your debt, such as consolidating credit cards or refinancing student loans to lower interest rates. Prepaying debt can also be a smart way to avoid interest charges and get rid of debt, freeing funds up to use for retirement savings.
  • Shoot to save 15% or more. As you might have figured out, saving a year’s worth of earnings every five years requires some intense saving habits. Of course, these funds will be invested and generate growth and returns that will do some of the work for you, so you can save a little less than 20% of your gross income. Saving 15% of your annual earnings is the typical suggestion.
  • Increase your savings rate a little at a time. If saving 15% feels out of reach, start smaller. Increase your retirement contribution rate by just 0.5%-1%. Then give yourself a few months to adjust, then raise it again and repeat until you’ve reached your target retirement savings rate. This method can help you ease into higher savings and find the right amount to balance retirement contributions with today’s costs.
  • Save “extra” funds when you can. If you’re behind on retirement savings, you can use extra income to play catch up. Instead of using bonuses and raises as more take-home pay, for instance, you can contribute this increase in pay to retirement savings.

It’s not too late to start saving for retirement, and every dollar you contribute now will count more than what you’d save later. That’s because saving for retirement in your 30s gives these funds over three decades to grow and for that growth to compound — time and money you simply can’t make up for later.

Take a look at your retirement savings and find one thing you can do to save more. Your future self will thank you.

Methodology

MagnifyMoney examined data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, a triennial report issued by the Federal Reserve, to determine relative retirement savings levels for various age and income ranges from 1998 through 2016 (the date of the latest study). We only include households with savings in at least one retirement account. All figures are in 2016 dollars.

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Elyssa Kirkham
Elyssa Kirkham |

Elyssa Kirkham is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Elyssa here

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