MidFirst Bank Review: Checking, Savings, CD, Money Market and IRA Accounts

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Updated on Tuesday, September 1, 2020

MidFirst Bank’s checking account options

M Checking

This account is overly complicated for a basic checking account.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $100
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $6, unless you keep at least $1,000 in the account or have a recurring monthly deposit of at least $250. If you’re 60 years or older, the monthly maintenance fee is reduced to $3.
  • ATM fee: $2 for each out-of-network ATM use. You also may owe an ATM surcharge fee from the ATM’s owner.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: If your account is overdrafted by less than $5 at the end of the day, you won’t owe any fees. Otherwise, it’ll be $34 per item, on up to 5 items per day. If your account stays overdrawn for a week, you’ll owe a one-time $25 extended overdraft fee. If you set up an overdraft transfer account or line of credit, you’ll instead pay $12.50 per day for any transfers.

MidFirst Bank offers several checking accounts. This non-interest-bearing account was designed to be the simpler of the go-to checking accounts. Unfortunately, it’s not really all that simple. Stick with us on this one.

This checking account comes with four tier levels, depending on what other products you have with MidFirst Bank and how much you have in them. Listing out each tier level, what you get with it, and what the qualifications are to get it would probably take up a quarter of this entire review, so here’s a chart to sum it all up.

However, here’s just one example. To qualify for the highest tier (Gold), you’ll need to have at least $50,000 in combined MidFirst Bank accounts (including deposits, loans and investments), a Savings or Titanium Money Market account, at least one other account type and make at least 10 transactions per month. If you can do that, this account comes with free cashier’s checks, traveler’s checks, money orders, one free box of checks per year, free paper statements, free wire transfers, and a 0.10% rate bump on savings, CDs and money market accounts.

By contrast, the lowest-level tier (Bronze) requires you to make at least 10 transactions per month, have at least $2,500 in combined deposit, loan and investment account balances and have at least one of the following: a Savings, Titanium Money Market, loan, CD, credit card, mortgage or investment account. If you can meet those requirements, you’ll get free money orders, cashier’s checks and traveler’s checks. You’ll also get a small rate bump of 0.05% on Savings, CDs, and Titanium Money Market accounts, as well as a discount on your first order of checks (they’ll only cost $5).

How to get MidFirst Bank’s M Checking account

If you live in Arizona, Colorado or Oklahoma, you can apply for this account online. If you live in another state, you’ll have to visit a local branch or call up the bank in order to open your account.

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on MidFirst Bank’s secure website

M+ Checking

This account is a carbon copy of the M Checking account, but earns interest.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.03%
$0.01-$2,499.99
0.05%
$2,500-$9,999.99
0.05%
$10,000-$19,999.99
0.10%
$20,000-$49,999.99
0.10%
Over $50,000.00
  • Minimum opening deposit: $100
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $10, unless you keep at least $1,500 in the account. If you’re age 60 or over, this fee will be reduced to $7.
  • ATM fee: $2 for each out-of-network ATM use. You also may owe an ATM surcharge fee from the ATM’s owner.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per item, up to 5 items per day. If your account is overdrawn by $5 or less, MidFirst Bank won’t charge you any overdraft fees. If your account stays overdrawn by 7 days or more, you’ll pay a one-time $25 “extended overdraft” fee. You can link up an overdraft line of credit or savings account, but any transfers will cost you $12.50 per day.

If you like the perks of the M Checking account (despite its complicated structure) but want to earn interest on the money you keep in your MidFirst Bank checking account, the M+ Checking account is for you.

This account also offers the same four-tier structure of benefits that the M Checking account offers. Again, see here for the full scoop, since it’s essentially a full-page poster full of fine print and details.

Even though this account offers interest, it does come with a higher monthly fee than the M Checking account ($10, versus $6). You can get this fee waived if you keep a larger balance in your checking account ($1,500, versus $1,000), but remember: that’s just one more hassle you have to remember each month. If you forget and end up having to pay the monthly fee for even a single month, that will likely negate months’ worth of interest payments.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s M+ Checking account

You can sign up for this account by visiting a local MidFirst Bank branch if you happen to live near one. Residents of Arizona, Colorado, and Oklahoma can also apply for an account online. If you don’t fit any of those categories and still want to open an account, you can contact the bank over the phone.

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Member FDIC

eChecking

This account trades off the M and M+ Checking’s perks for a higher interest rate.
Tier LevelAPYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
Gold Tier1.50%
$0.01
Silver Tier0.80%
$0.01
Bronze Tier0.40%
$0.01
Base Tier0.01%
$0.01
  • Minimum opening deposit: $100
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $12, unless you meet the requirements for the Bronze, Silver or Gold tiers
  • ATM fee: $2 for each out-of-network ATM use. You also may owe an ATM surcharge fee from the ATM’s owner.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $34 on up to 5 charges per day. You can link up an overdraft account or line of credit. If you do this, any transfers will occur once per day and cost you $12.50. No overdraft fees will be charged if your account is overdrawn by $5 or less. If your account stays overdrawn for more than 7 days, you’ll also pay a one-time $25 extended overdraft fee.

This account comes with its own tier system as well. Thankfully, it’s a lot simpler. Each tier level (except Base) gives you three things: a higher interest rate on this checking account, a small interest rate bump on a savings, money market or CD account and a waiver for the monthly fee. Here’s a chart showing exactly what you need to do to qualify for each tier level. Mainly, it’s a case of making a certain number of debit card purchases each month and completing certain other transactions with your account.

This account would be best for people who don’t care about the nit-picking perks on the M and M+ Checking accounts, like discounts on safe deposit boxes and free traveler’s checks (seriously, who uses traveler’s checks anymore anyway?). Instead, this account offers something better: higher interest rates.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s eChecking account

If you have your Social Security number, driver’s license and physical address handy and happen to live in Arizona, Colorado or Oklahoma, you can open this account online. Otherwise, you’ll either have to visit a local MidFirst Bank branch or call them up to open an account.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on MidFirst Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

Minimal Checking

This account doesn’t come with any bells and whistles, but it’s simple and free.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $100
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None
  • ATM fee: $2 for each out-of-network ATM use. You also may owe an ATM surcharge fee from the ATM’s owner.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per item, on up to 5 items each day (but only if you overdraw your account by more than $5). If your account stays overdrawn by 7 days, you’ll owe a one-time $25 “extended overdraft” fee on the eighth day. If you link up an overdraft line of credit or bank account, you’ll instead pay $12.50 per transfer, which will occur once at the end of the day.

MidFirst Bank’s main checking accounts are somewhat confusing with their multi-tiered offering. If you instead yearn for something simpler that doesn’t require a magnifying glass and still want to bank with this company, then this account is probably the best one for you.

This account doesn’t offer any interest. It does, however, offer all the hallmarks of a basic, no-frills checking account you’d expect, like online banking and bill pay and mobile banking.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s Minimal Checking account

Unless you happen to live near a local MidFirst Bank branch, chances are you’ll have to call up the bank directly to open an account. It only supports online applications from people living in Arizona, Colorado and Oklahoma. You’ll also need to provide your driver’s license, address, and Social Security Number.

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Go! Checking

Kids, teens and young adults can use this account to learn the ropes of how checking account works with this free account.
  • Minimum opening deposit: $25
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None
  • ATM fee: $2 for each out-of-network ATM use. You also may owe an ATM surcharge fee from the ATM’s owner.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $34 per each charge that overdraws your account by $5 or more, up to 5 times daily. If your account stays overdrawn by 7 days or more, you’ll also pay a $25 “extended overdraft” fee (but only once). If you’d rather pay $12.50 per day for any and all overdraft transfers that occur, you can link up an overdraft line of credit or savings account.

This account is available to anyone up to the age of 24. There is no minimum age for this checking account, but if you’re under age 17, you will need a parent or guardian to be a joint owner on the account with you.
This account also doesn’t earn any interest. It’s a bit easier to open for young adults because it only requires $25 to get started, rather than the typical $100 for the other adult checking accounts. It still comes with all the normal features you’d expect from a basic checking account, including online banking, mobile banking and bill pay.

Aside from that, there are no special features with this checking account. Many checking accounts for kids and teens at other banks offer at least some extra perk designed to help younger people out, such as age-appropriate financial education or special elevated interest rates.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s Go! Checking account

If you’d like to open this account for your child, you’ll need both your and your child’s Social Security number. You can open an account at a branch location, over the phone or online. The online option is only available to residents of Arizona, Colorado and Oklahoma.

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How MidFirst Bank’s checking accounts compare

We’ll start off with the good points about MidFirst Bank. Its eChecking account offers a decent interest rate, but only if you can reach the Gold tier level (a handy task, since it requires making at least 30 debit card purchases per month).

Now, the bad. Most of these checking accounts are almost as complex to understand as the tax code. This means it’ll take some serious work on your part to meet the requirements each month to earn the perks and avoid paying the monthly fee. We’ll bet that just like at a casino, chances are you’ll be separated from more of your money than you earn in the long term, especially if you’re not always on top of making sure you meet the requirements.

There are also the high fees that come with these accounts. The monthly fees are high enough, but then you’ve also got to worry about the high overdraft fees (which take a full paragraph to explain). We didn’t even mention this yet — if you want paper statements, you may need to pay an extra $2 monthly fee.

Finally, the nail in the coffin for these accounts is the low interest rates that are offered (with, as we already noted, the Gold tier on the eChecking account). That’s even if the account offers interest at all — half of them do not. Instead, we recommend these checking accounts because they offer lower fees, higher interest rates, and a much reduced amount of fine print.

MidFirst Bank’s savings account options

Performance Savings

The Performance Savings account doesn’t really perform well in the interest rate department.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.10%
$0.01-$9,999.99
0.10%
Over $10,000
  • Minimum opening deposit: $100
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $0.01
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $4, unless you keep at least $250 in the account
  • ATM fee: $2 for each out-of-network ATM use. You also may owe an ATM surcharge fee from the ATM’s owner.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $34 for each overdraft charge on up to 5 overdraft charges per day. If the overdrafts don’t overdraw your account by more than $5, you won’t pay any fees. If your account is still overdrawn after a week, you’ll owe a separate one-time $25 “extended overdraft” fee. You are able to set up transfers from another account or line of credit, and this will instead cost you $12.50 per day that any transfers are made.

MidFirst Bank only offers one savings account for adults, and this is it. This account is best for people at MidFirst Bank who have smaller savings balances. You can earn more money with the Titanium Money Market account, but you’ll need to keep a balance of at least $5,000 in there to avoid the monthly fee. For savers just starting out, that’s a high bar to pass.

Still, this account isn’t entirely free either. It comes with a $4 monthly fee, which you can get waived if you keep at least $250 in the account. This means, unfortunately, that it’s not a good idea to liquidate the account and use those savings for, well, something you’ve saved up for.

Since this is a savings account, federal regulations (Regulation D, to be specific) allows up to six certain debits per month. Certain types of withdrawals don’t count toward this limit. You can make as many ATM, in person or by-mail withdrawals as you want. But for the other withdrawal types, you’ll have to pay an $8 per-withdrawal fee for each withdrawal you make over the limit each month.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s Performance Savings account

You’ll need a few pieces of information to open this account, such as your name, Social Security number, driver’s license and address. Only residents of certain states (Arizona, Colorado and Oklahoma) can open an account online. Everyone else will either need to open an account in person or over the phone.

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on MidFirst Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

iSave Savings Program

This kids savings account offers a bonus if your child saves each month for a year.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.15%
$0.01-$9,999.99
0.15%
Over $10,000
  • Minimum opening deposit: $25
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $0.01
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: None
  • Overdraft fee: $34 for each overdraft, with up to 5 overdraft charges per day. MidFirst Bank will only charge an overdraft if your account is overdrawn by more than $5. If your account stays overdrawn for a week, you’ll also owe a $25 “extended overdraft” fee, but only once. If you link up an overdraft backup account or line of credit, any transfers will be done at the end of the day, and you’ll only be charged a $12.50 one-time fee.

If you have a child under age 17, they’re eligible to open this account. It’s more kid-friendly because it doesn’t have a monthly fee, offers a higher interest rate (barely, but still a tad higher) and has a lower minimum opening deposit. The account also offers educational materials for kids in the form of newsletters, coloring pages and a savings passbook. Unfortunately, this account does not come with ATM access.

MidFirst Bank also offers a special bonus if your child makes at least one deposit a month for an entire year. But as usual, it’s a bit complicated to figure out. Here’s a chart, but to sum it up: take the average of the highest single deposit amount your child makes each month. Then, divide that number in half. For example, if the average highest deposit amount is $40, your child can get a $20 bonus. The amount of the bonus can’t exceed $25, so don’t get too excited about it.

Your child is allowed up to six certain withdrawals, as per federal Regulation D guidelines. If they do, they’ll pay a lower excess withdrawal fee of just $3. And again, withdrawals made by mail or in person don’t count toward these limits.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s iSave Savings Program

The only way to open this account is by visiting a local branch. You cannot open this account over the phone or online, unfortunately.

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How MidFirst Bank’s savings accounts compare

If you’re looking to earn good interest rates, we’ve got bad news for you. MidFirst Bank’s savings accounts won’t get you there. Not only does the bank offer just a fraction of the rates the best online savings accounts are offering, but its Performance Savings account doesn’t even meet the current national average savings account rates.

We’re also a bit turned off by the fees that come with these accounts. One way that banks make their money is by taking what you deposit and loaning it out to other people. That’s why most banks don’t charge a monthly fee on savings accounts, because you’re actually doing them a favor by depositing your money with them. We think that it’s an unfair policy to charge for savings accounts, and so we recommend passing on the ones that MidFirst Bank offer.

MidFirst Bank’s CD rates

Relationship CD

MidFirst Bank does offer a wide range of term lengths from three months to 10 years.
TermAPY
91 day0.15%
182 day0.20%
9 month special1.85%
12 month0.25%
14 month special2.50%
18 month0.30%
23 month special2.30%
24 month0.35%
30 month special0.45%
36 month0.45%
48 month0.50%
60 month0.60%
84 month0.70%
120 month0.80%
  • Minimum opening deposit: $1,000 for normal CDs, $5,000 for special CDs
  • Minimum balance amount to earn APY: $1,000 for normal CDs, $5,000 for special CDs
  • Early withdrawal penalty: For each early withdrawal, you’ll pay a $25 fee plus either 1% of the amount you withdraw (for CDs 12 months and under) or 3% (for CDs over 12 months).

If you really want somewhere to keep your money for the longest term possible, MidFirst Bank might be your best choice. This bank offers term lengths that range up to 10 years in length — that’s right, a full decade. These CDs come with pretty standard policies and there’s nothing too surprising here. These aren’t terrible interest rates, but they’re not really competitive with the best rates out there. Its special-offer CDs come a bit closer, but still, you can find better rates at other banks. .

You are allowed to withdraw interest payments from these CDs, but if you do so, you might earn a lower interest rate than the one advertised. When your CD matures, it will automatically renew for another term length. You can withdraw the money during a 10-day grace period if you wish. You can also choose a different term length or add more money to the CD. If you do either of these two things, the grace period will end and the new CD will start.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s Relationship CDs

There are two ways to open one of these CDs: you’ll either have to visit a local branch of MidFirst Bank, or call them up over the phone to open an account.

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Callable Relationship CD

This CD offers the same interest rates as the regular Relationship CDs with no clear advantage.
TermAPY
24 month with 6 month lock0.35%
24 month with 3 month lock0.35%
36 month with 1 year lock0.45%
60 month with 2 year lock0.60%
60 month with 1 year lock0.60%
60 month with 6 month lock0.60%
84 month with 2 year lock0.70%
84 month with 1 year lock0.70%
84 month with 6 month lock0.70%
  • Minimum opening deposit: $5,000
  • Minimum balance amount to earn APY: $5,000
  • Early withdrawal penalty: $25, plus 3% of the amount you withdraw

Callable Relationship CDs work a little bit differently than normal CDs. In this case, when you open a Callable CD, you’re guaranteed to earn the interest rate stated for at least the term of the rate lock. After that point, MidFirst Bank can “call back” the CD, cashing out the balance owed to you and closing the account.

For example, if you open up an 84 month Callable Relationship CD with a 6 month lock, you’re guaranteed to earn those rates for at least 6 months. But after that — for the next 78 months — the bank can close the CD and pay it out to you at any time. Typically, banks do this if interest rates fall and they don’t want to pay you those high rates anymore.

When the Callable Relationship CDs mature (if they make it to that point), they will automatically renew for another term. You do get a 10-day grace period to withdraw the money, add more funds or make any other changes to the account before it’s locked in place again.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s Callable Relationship CDs

If you want to open one of these CDs, you’ll need to either visit a local MidFirst Bank branch or call the bank up directly. The bank does not support online applications for this account type.

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How MidFirst Bank’s CD rates compare

The interest rates offered on these CDs aren’t bad, but they’re certainly not the best out there. In fact, you can earn even higher rates with one of these current top-ranked CDs.

Aside from that, we’re a bit perplexed by the Callable Relationship CDs that MidFirst Bank offers. Often banks will offer higher interest rates on these Callable Relationship CDs because they want to incentivize you to choose these CDs as they help out the bank’s bottom line if rates drop. But look closely — the interest rates offered on these Callable Relationship CDs is currently the same as on the regular Relationship CDs!

The bank also isn’t currently offering interest rate premiums with different rate-lock periods. Each term length, regardless of the rate lock, is currently offering the same rate. In sum, there’s no real advantage to these CDs anyway. If anything, it’s disadvantageous to open Callable Relationship CDs because you’ll get the same rate as the normal CDs, but the bank can throw a monkey wrench in your plans to close your CD at any time after the rate-lock period expires.

MidFirst Bank’s money market account option

Titanium Money Market

This is the highest-yielding liquid savings account at MidFirst Bank.
APYMinimum Balance to Earn APY
0.05%
$0.01-$9,999.99
0.05%
$10,000-$24,999.99
0.05%
$25,000-$49,999.99
0.05%
$50,000-$74,999.99
0.15%
$75,000-$249,999.99
0.15%
Over $250,000
  • Minimum opening deposit: $100
  • Minimum balance to earn APY: $0.01
  • Monthly account maintenance fee: $10, unless you keep at least $5,000 in your account
  • ATM fee: $2 for each out-of-network ATM use. You also may owe an ATM surcharge fee from the ATM’s owner.
  • ATM fee refund: None
  • Overdraft fee: $12.50 per once-daily transfer if you have an overdraft account or line of credit linked up. Otherwise, you’ll pay $34 per overdraft on up to 5 overdraft charges per day (but only if your account is overdrawn by more than $5). If your account stays overdrawn for 7 days or more, you’ll also pay a one-time $25 “extended overdraft” fee.

It’ll take a much larger deposit amount ($5,000, to be exact) to maintain this account without having to pay a monthly fee. But if you can afford it, you can earn much higher rates than with MidFirst Bank’s relatively poor Performance Savings account. Keep in mind that this means you won’t be able to liquidate the account fully (unless you’re willing to pay the monthly fee). This essentially means that the $5,000 deposit will be dead weight in the account, since you won’t be able to use it freely.

You can make an unlimited number of ATM, in-person, or by-mail withdrawals with this account. But due to the pesky federal Regulation D rules, you’re allowed up to six certain debits of any other type (ACH withdrawals and transfers, for example). If you go above that limit, MidFirst Bank will charge you a $10 per-withdrawal fee.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s Titanium Money Market account

If you have a Social Security number and a driver’s license, you can open an account online, over the phone or by visiting a local branch. Online applications are only supported for people living in Arizona, Colorado or Oklahoma.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on MidFirst Bank’s secure website

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How MidFirst Bank’s money market account compares

MidFirst Bank doesn’t offer horrible rates on its money market account. We’d hope not, since the thing requires a very large $5,000 deposit (if you want to avoid the monthly fee). Still, we’d like to see much higher rates for a deposit amount this high.

In fact, the top money market accounts are currently offering much better rates. Many of these accounts have a much smaller minimum deposit size, and offer several times what MidFirst Bank is offering for its money market account. That’s why we recommend these accounts instead.

MidFirst Bank’s IRA account options

Relationship IRA CD

You can earn much better rates on IRA CDs elsewhere.
TermAPY
91 day0.15%
182 day0.20%
9 month special1.85%
12 month0.25%
14 month special2.50%
18 month0.30%
23 month special2.30%
24 month0.35%
30 month special0.60%
36 month0.45%
48 month0.50%
60 month0.60%
84 month0.70%
120 month0.80%
  • Minimum opening deposit: $1,000 for normal CDs, $5,000 for special CDs
  • Minimum balance amount to earn APY: $1,000 for normal CDs, $5,000 for special CDs
  • Early withdrawal penalty: For each early withdrawal, you’ll pay a $25 fee plus either 1% of the amount you withdraw (for CDs 12 months and under) or 3% (for CDs over 12 months).

Retirement savings are by definition a long-term savings goal, perfect for CDs. If you decide to go that route, it’s best to open an IRA CD specifically, because then you can get the tax breaks that come with IRA accounts.

Other than that, these IRA CDs work exactly the same way as MidFirst Bank’s Relationship CDs. You put money in, it earns interest and then it matures and auto-renews for another term. If you want to withdraw or roll over your IRA into another account at MidFirst Bank or another investment firm, you will get a brief 10-day grace period after each renewal.

How to get MidFirst Bank’s IRA CDs

To open one of these IRA CDs, you’ll have to bring your driver’s license to a local MidFirst Bank branch. There is no online account opening option. Alternatively, you can call up the bank to open an account.

SEE DETAILS Secured

on MidFirst Bank’s secure website

Member FDIC

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How MidFirst Bank’s IRA CD rates compare

The cool thing about MidFirst Bank’s IRA CDs is that you can choose from ultra long-term lengths. Most banks only offer IRA CDs out to 5 year terms, but MidFirst Bank offers terms up to a full decade in length. That’s great for long-term savings goals like retirement.

What’s not so cool is the interest rates offered. That 10 year IRA CD, for example, is offering much less than the top 5 year IRA CDs at other banks. This means that by choosing MidFirst Bank’s IRA CDs, not only are you earning subpar interest rates, but you’re locking yourself into earning those subpar interest rates for twice as long as if you searched for the highest IRA CD rates elsewhere.

Overall review of MidFirst Bank’s banking products

MidFirst Bank starts out with a good reputation from its J.D. Power customer satisfaction award. But once you knuckle down and eye out each account, a clearer picture emerges: This bank really isn’t any different from any of the other big banks charging high fees and low rates for its bank accounts.

There’s also a whole slew of fees we haven’t mentioned yet that apply to each account. If you close any of your accounts within 90 days of opening them (if you’re not happy with how many fees you’re being charged, for example), the bank will charge you a $25 “account closing” fee. If you haven’t made any transactions with a given account for more than 12 months, you’ll also pay a $5 monthly “inactivity fee.” Want paper statements instead of e-statements? That’ll most likely be another $2 monthly charge.

The bank also charges a $2 out-of-network ATM fee, in addition to whatever ATM surcharge fees are tacked on by the ATM’s owner. But since the bank itself only allows you to use a microscopic network of just over 100 bank-owned ATMs for free, this virtually guarantees you’ll be paying ATM fees at some point or another, especially if you’re a heavy ATM user.

Instead, we recommend skipping MidFirst Bank for a better bank. You can easily find better banks, especially if you’re willing to do your banking online or with a reputable credit union.

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