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Average Savings by Age: How Much You’ve Saved vs What You Need

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

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The average American household has $183,200 tucked away in savings, with about 83% of that in retirement accounts. That leaves an average of about $31,000 for emergencies and non-retirement savings goals, such as buying a house or car, going on vacation or putting money away for college tuition.

To know if you’re on track to meet your savings and retirement goals, it helps to compare your progress with the average savings by age.

The average savings account balance by age

As your age increases, so should your bank balance (until a certain age). Let’s break down the findings by age group.

Average savings: Younger than 35

The average non-retirement savings for someone younger than 35 is $8,362, according to calculations by ValuePenguin, which, like MagnifyMoney, is owned by LendingTree.

While this number is low, money may be tight at this stage of life. People in this age group could be just over a decade into their careers, which can put them on the lower end of salary ranges.

The median earnings for Americans ages 25 to 34 are $837 a week, or $43,524 a year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Expenses such as housing, transportation and student loans can consume a good amount of income.

Keep in mind that the average age of a millennial homebuyer is 30.5, so mortgage down payments could be lowering the average savings.

Average savings: Ages 35-44

Between the ages of 35 and 44, the average non-retirement savings balance is $20,839.

During this decade, earnings grow. The median earnings are $1,022 a week, or $53,144 a year.

At this stage, more people are homeowners and parents of young children. The average cost of raising a child to the age of 18 is $233,610, or about $14,000 a year.

Average savings: Ages 45-54

Once you’re between the ages of 45 and 54, the average non-retirement balance is $30,441.

Retirement could be coming closer into view. And since more couples are delaying parenthood until their 30s, college tuition bills could be looming. Tuition and fees at a four-year public school average about $10,000 a year, but that doesn’t include room and board.

Fortunately, this decade is where Americans average the most earnings. The median earnings are $1,025 a week — or $53,300 per year — giving you a greater ability to save for emergencies, goals and retirement.

Average savings: Ages 55-64

Between the ages of 55 and 64, the average non-retirement savings account is $45,133. This could be a time when you start winding down your career and make your last push for retirement savings.

The median earnings in this age group fall slightly to $1,009 a week, or $52,468 a year. You should max out your retirement contributions and meet with a professional to see if you’re on track.

Of note, 47% of people opt to start taking Social Security benefits between the ages of 62 and 64. If you purchased a home at the average age of 30.5 on a 30-year mortgage, this is when you could pay off your mortgage if you didn’t refinance or sell the home. This helps to reduce your expenses and free up available funds for saving.

Average savings: Ages 65-74

Between the ages of 65 and 74, the average non-retirement savings balance is $54,089. More than 1 in 6 seniors work past age 65, according to ValuePenguin.

The median earnings for Americans older than 65 are $949 a week, or $49,348 a year. (Note that the BLS doesn’t track specific earning data between the ages of 65 and 74. Median earnings are estimated for those age 65 and older.)

Expenses should fall during this decade with child rearing most likely done.

Average savings: Age 75 and older

Once you reach age 75, the average non-retirement savings balance is $42,291.

The amount declines for the first time because you’re likely withdrawing some of your money for living expenses. And your ability to add to your savings also declines as many Americans have left the workforce by this age, even though the labor force participation rate for the 75-plus age group has nearly doubled in the past 20 years.

As we noted in the ages 65 to 74 section, the BLS doesn’t break down earnings’ estimates beyond 65 and older, so we’re looking at the same figures: $949 a week, or $49,348 a year.

How much you should have saved at each age

Your savings will likely have a purpose, such as emergencies, goals or retirement. To know if you are putting enough money away, it helps to follow these rules of thumb.

An emergency fund should contain three to six months’ worth of expenses, which will vary depending on your lifestyle and expenses.

Based on 2018 average annual expenditures from the BLS, we’ll provide emergency fund savings goals by age group. The low end includes three months’ worth of expenses, while the high end includes six months.

Let’s switch the focus to retirement savings. The average millennial has $24,570 in retirement savings, while the average baby boomer has $279,250.

Your target retirement balance can be calculated based on your income. By age 30, per Fidelity, you should have saved one times your income. By 50, that number grows to six times. And by 67, you should have saved 10 times your income.

According to the Census Bureau, the median household income in 2018 was $61,937. Based on these figures, here is a good general goal.

Tips for saving more money

While the average American household has a savings balance of $30,600, the median balance is $7,000. The average is the sum of all savings accounts divided by the number of account holders, while the median is the middle point in a number set.

The median amount offers a better representation of what most Americans have saved, since averages can be greatly impacted by outliers, such as high-income individuals with large deposit account balances.

If you are closer to the median than the average, It’s a good idea to address the gaps that exist by putting some savings strategies in place.

Follow the 50/30/20 budgeting rule

With the 50/30/20 rule, half of your income goes toward essential expenses (“needs”), such as housing, transportation, groceries and utilities. Thirty percent goes toward non-essential expenses (“wants”), such as dining out, clothes or cable TV. The remaining 20% of your income can go toward savings. Following this rule can help you avoid living paycheck to paycheck, as 78% of Americans do.

Pay down debt

One of the best ways to save money is to reduce expenses, such as high-interest credit card debt. The fewer bills you have, the more income you have available to sock away. You could use the debt snowball method, which pays off the lowest balance first to build motivation and momentum. Or consider the debt avalanche, which pays off the loans with the highest interest first. Whichever method you use, make it a priority to meet your savings goals. MagnifyMoney has a calculator than can help you decide between the two methods.

Save your tax refund

It can be tempting to spend a tax refund on something fun, such as a vacation, because it feels like a windfall. However, take advantage of the lump sum and put it toward your savings goals. The average tax refund for Americans in 2019 was $2,868, and saving it can put you well on your way to a higher bank balance.

Automate monthly savings

If you have to physically transfer money into savings, you’ll be less likely to do it. Instead, sign up for automatic savings deposits each pay period. You can divide it into non-retirement and retirement accounts. Chime Bank, for example, found that its members who signed up for automatic savings were able to put away more than three times as much money as members who didn’t.

Maximize interest rates

While it’s convenient to have your savings in the bank where you do your checking, the interest rates are often negligible, with the average savings account paying 0.09% APY, according to ValuePenguin. It’s possible to earn a much higher rate, so let your money work harder for you by choosing accounts that pay higher rates, such as high-interest savings accounts, certificates of deposit (CDs) or money market accounts.

Where you should keep your savings

The type of account you choose for your savings will depend on how you plan to use the money. Are you saving for a long-term or short-term goal? For some purposes, you’ll want an account that is more liquid than others.

For day-to-day expenses, you’ll want to use a checking account that allows you to make unlimited withdrawals each month. You can get an interest checking account, which pays an average of 0.06% APY.

For short-term goals, consider savings and money market accounts. Although, it’s important to know that most have restrictions on your number of withdrawals per month. The average savings account pays 0.09% APY, while the average money market account pays 0.16% APY.

You could place your emergency fund in a high-yield savings account, which keeps your money safe and pays a decent interest rate — often 2% or more.

If you don’t need your funds soon, you can choose an investment product such as a CD, which requires that you keep your money in place for a set period. Rates vary depending on the length of your CD term.

For retirement savings, you’ll need to put your money into an account designated for retirement savings, such as an individual retirement account (IRA), Roth IRA or a 401(k) plan offered by your employer.

To break it down, more than half of Americans have a savings account, 18% have money market deposit accounts, 7% have one or more CDs and 52% have at least one retirement account, according to MagnifyMoney research.

The bottom line

Many Americans aren’t saving enough for retirement or emergencies. In fact, only 48% of Americans have enough money to cover a $1,000 emergency, according to LendingTree.

By checking your milestones and comparing average savings by age group, you’ll have a better idea if you’re on track or if you’ve got some catching up to do.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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COVID-19 Relief Package: What Congress and Banks Are Offering

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

American taxpayers can finally expect some relief heading their way, thanks to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, signed into law two months after the coronavirus (COVID-19) first appeared in the U.S. This $2 trillion financial relief package seeks to provide assistance to affected taxpayers as well as small businesses and corporations.

In addition to the government’s efforts, banks across the country have also stepped up. To help you navigate these challenging times and make sure you’re aware of all potential resources, we’ve compiled the latest information on the government’s relief packages and relief plans from the big banks.

We will continue to update this page as the situation evolves.

One-time stimulus checks

Taxpayers’ long-awaited direct payments, or recovery rebates, will be determined by their most recent tax return. For many, this will be your 2019 tax return, since we have yet to file taxes for 2020. If you have not yet filed your 2019 tax return, the government will turn to your 2018 return instead.

How much you’ll get: For individuals, the plan will provide one-time direct payments of $1,200 ($2,400 for joint returns) to those with an annual income of $75,000 or less. Payments will decrease incrementally for those who made more than $75,000 and will stop altogether for individuals who earned more than $99,000. Individuals will also receive an additional $500 per child.

To find the estimated amount of your recovery rebate check, drag your cursor along the line below to your corresponding income amount. We also have a stimulus check calculator you can use to determine your payment amount.

How to sign up: For most taxpayers, there’s no need to sign up for this. All you need is a valid Social Security number to receive these relief rebates. The IRS will distribute these payments based on information from your most recent tax return.

If you receive Social Security benefits or do not typically file a tax return, the IRS will use the information on your 1099 Social Security forms (Form SSA-1099 or Form RRB-1099) to determine your payments. Individuals who qualify with these forms will not receive additional payments for dependents, as the forms do not disclose dependent information. The IRS includes senior citizens, Social Security recipients and railroad retirees in this group. If that does not include you but you typically don’t file a tax return, you may want to file a simple tax return as soon as possible to receive the economic impact payments.

In conjunction with the IRS, the U.S. Treasury Department has plans to create an online portal where individuals can submit their most recent banking information to the IRS. Check back here or the IRS’s coronavirus information page for updates.

How you’ll get the check: Depending on what you requested on your tax return, the IRS will send the payment either via direct deposit or a paper check. If your address or bank account information has changed since 2018, file your 2019 tax return as soon as possible, if you haven’t already.

When the checks will come: As of now, taxpayers can expect to see payments sometime in April.

Are the checks taxed? These recovery rebates are considered advanced tax credits for 2020 and should not be taxed for most. Since the payment amounts are determined based on your previous tax returns, however, the payments could be subject to adjustment if you earned more or less this year compared to prior years.

For example, if you received too large of a rebate proportionate to your most recent income, you could end up owing back the excess. However, it is so far expected that taxpayers will not have to return or pay tax on any portion of these rebates, regardless of income changes. If you receive a payment that is too low, you also may be able to receive a tax credit from your 2020 taxes to make up the difference.

Expanded unemployment benefits

For starters, individuals who have found themselves unable to work as a result of COVID-19, including those who are sick, quarantined or taking care of family members, will be able to collect unemployment, extending those benefits beyond those who were fired or laid off.

The stimulus bill will also add $600 on top of existing unemployment benefits (currently averaging about $300 a week) for four months and extend unemployment insurance by 13 weeks. The bill will also ensure that workers maintain their full salaries if they lose their job due to the coronavirus pandemic.

This additional funding will come from the federal government rather than from states and employers, who typically fund unemployment benefits. Unemployment benefits are still taxable under current law, which the stimulus bill does not account for.

Eased penalties around retirement account withdrawals

The bill also allows those affected by COVID-19 to withdraw up to $100,000 from qualified retirement accounts, including your 401(k) and IRAs, without facing the 10% early withdrawal penalty that typically applies when you make withdrawals when you are under the age of 59 ½. You will still have to pay income taxes on your withdrawals, though these taxes will now be due over the course of three years instead of immediately. Additionally, the bill waives required minimum distributions (RMDs) for select retirement plans for this year.

Qualified individuals include those who are diagnosed with COVID-19 or have a spouse or dependent who has been diagnosed with COVID-19, as well as those who have been laid off, quarantined, furloughed or faced reduced hours due to the pandemic. This applies through Dec. 31, 2020.

Even though the bill allows it, withdrawing from your retirement accounts before you’ve actually hit retirement is generally not the best plan — especially if you’re already close to retiring. By doing so, you run the high risk of hurting the nest egg that you’ve worked hard to build for retirement. Still, this may be the only source of money available to many right now.

Small business relief

The stimulus plan includes $425 billion for the Federal Reserve to leverage for emergency loans to distressed companies and $75 billion for industry-specific loans. Despite previous claims from President Trump that he alone would choose which businesses received aid, this lending system will fall under oversight by an inspector general and a congressionally-appointed panel.

The spending package also provides $350 billion that will go toward lending programs for small businesses, but only those that keep their payrolls steady through the crisis. There is also a reward for small businesses that keep their workers in the form of federally-guaranteed loans that will be forgiven if the employer continues to pay its workers throughout this time of crisis.

Additionally, the plan allocates $130 billion for hospitals and $150 billion for state and local governments.

Banks’ responses to COVID-19

In the meantime, millions of Americans are struggling with changes to their work hours and incomes. Some banks are offering relief packages of their own, often waiving certain fees or offering expedited services. Certain banks, like Ally Bank, are providing more robust aid than others, while several big banks have not committed to providing widespread support. Although not listed below, community banks may offer a stronger support system to those financially affected.

Many banks also warn customers about keeping their information and money safe from fraudsters. Unfortunately, scams and phishing attempts are cropping up to take advantage of this crisis. Be wary of phone calls, emails and texts from suspicious senders who ask for personal or account information, and avoid clicking on links in emails and texts. When in doubt, head to your institution’s official website to verify the bank’s contact information or log into your account to access its secure messaging system.

Wondering whether your bank is offering a relief package? Here’s what some of the biggest banks are offering.

American Express

American Express has not released any specific COVID-19 relief plans to help its Personal Savings banking customers at this time.

Customers of the online-only bank can continue to access their accounts online. They can also call customer service at 1-800-446-6307 — just beware that wait times may be longer than usual.

Ally Bank

Online-only Ally Bank currently has an expansive COVID-19 relief plan, especially in comparison to other banks. The bank has outlined measures to help customers, employees and communities.

Until July 16, 2020, Ally Bank deposits customers can benefit from waived overdraft fees; free expedited checks and debit cards; and waived excessive transaction fees on your savings or money market accounts.

Transfers and online payments remain uninterrupted. Plus, Ally Bank has made it faster to deposit checks of $50,000 or less online with Ally eCheck deposit. You can still use mobile deposit via the Ally Mobile app.

Bank of America

Bank of America’s COVID-19 response so far is encouraging its customers to turn to mobile and online banking first, both of which allow you to check your account statuses, pay bills and deposit checks.

However, Bank of America financial centers remain open. The bank’s locations are open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. local time, while Saturdays maintain regular hours, which vary from branch to branch. Branches that remain open undergo “enhanced, daily cleanings” and “other measures to limit the risk of exposure, based on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).”

As for relief in light of the coronavirus outbreak, Bank of America urges any customers who are facing financial hardship to contact a representative who will “work with you to create a solution tailored to your particular situation” or use its virtual assistant, Erica, to get answers to any questions. For banking customers, relief solutions can include waiving certain fees, such as overdraft fees.

Capital One

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, Capital One is waiving its out-of-network ATM fee. It won’t reimburse you for a third-party surcharge, though.

If you are facing financial difficulties, you can contact Capital One and a representative can help to find a solution for you. Note that customer service wait times are likely longer than usual right now.

Capital One has temporarily closed select branches that do not have drive-thru tellers or protective glass at teller counters. Branches that do have those features will remain open via those outlets and are being disinfected per CDC guidelines. Tellers may still assist customers in the lobby in special circumstances. Capital One ATMs remain open 24/7. Capital One also strongly encourages its customers to use the Capital One mobile app or online banking to make payments, check balances and deposit checks.

Charles Schwab

Charles Schwab has no specific measures in place to provide relief aid to its banking customers amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Schwab branches are temporarily closed as of March 20 and will remain so until local, state and federal government recommendations indicate it is safe to reopen. Still, you can contact a branch directly by phone to reach a representative. Schwab also encourages customers to go digital by completing tasks online or via its mobile app, which includes check-depositing capabilities.

Chase

In light of the pandemic, Chase Bank customers are encouraged to use the Chase Mobile app and online banking to complete their account-related tasks. Chase asks that those who need help because of COVID-19 reach out to a representative, though you may experience wait times that are longer than usual.

Several Chase branches are temporarily closed, while other branches’ hours and services have been adjusted. You can check the status of your branch on the Chase Mobile app or online. Chase branches and ATMs are being cleaned with EPA-approved disinfectants.

On a wider scale, JPMorgan Chase has pledged $50 million to nonprofit organizations to help support “healthcare, food and other humanitarian relief” efforts globally; community partners; and small businesses in the U.S., China and Europe.

Citibank

For at least 30 days starting March 9, Citibank will waive monthly service fees and penalties for early withdrawals from CDs. Citibank also asks that those affected by COVID-19 contact the bank for assistance, although wait times may be longer than usual. If you already work with a personal banker or financial advisor through Citibank, you can contact them directly during their regular business hours.

Select Citibank branches are closed and those that are open are undergoing “daily cleaning procedures … on high-touch surfaces,” providing hand sanitizer and practicing CDC recommendations like social distancing. You can also access your accounts and funds via the Citi Mobile app, the Citibank website and Citi ATMs on a 24/7 basis.

Discover

Discover has “support in place for qualified Discover customers who experience hardship” due to the coronavirus pandemic. Although it is unclear what qualifies customers to receive this support, a Discover representative adds that “Discover customers may receive assistance related to payments, fees and interest.”

Discover Online Banking customers can call 1-800-347-7000 (TTY/TDD 1-800-347-7454) any time to reach a Discover representative for assistance. You also can continue to access your accounts online or via the Discover mobile app.

Goldman Sachs Bank USA

Customers of Marcus by Goldman Sachs can make penalty-free withdrawals from regular CDs at this time, as a direct response to COVID-19. You can do so by calling 1-855-730-7283. Marcus contact centers are operating virtually, with temporary hours of 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET on Saturday and Sunday.

You can still access your Marcus accounts online. Apple device users can also benefit from the Marcus mobile app.

PNC Bank

PNC Bank customers who are experiencing financial hardship as a result of COVID-19 should call 1-888-762-2265, which is available 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. ET Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET on Saturday and Sunday.

If you are eligible for assistance, a PNC representative will discuss your options with you, which include waiving or refunding fees on deposit accounts (and other products). Qualified customers can also take out an emergency hardship loan “at a low rate.” PNC did not make it clear how it determines eligibility for assistance, but it stressed that customers should call for help.

As of March 20, select PNC branches are closed. Others remain open with limited hours and access, with some are operating via drive-up window only. You can use PNC’s branch locator to check the status of a branch and to find a branch that offers essential appointments, made available for safe deposit box access, loan closings or other banking services that you cannot make otherwise. PNC is also still widely accessible via online, mobile and voice banking.

TD Bank

TD Bank encourages customers affected by COVID-19 to call 1-888-751-9000 to see how the bank can support you as it says it “may be able to provide some financial relief.” Of course, wait times are uncharacteristically long at this time.

Assistance options offered by TD Bank will depend on your situation and request but may include fee refunds, early, penalty-free access to CDs and payment extensions. The bank’s customer assistance offers continue to evolve as well, according to a bank representative.

Select TD Bank branches are temporarily closed, while others remain open at either full-service or drive-thru only status. Branches that are open also have reduced hours, including closure on Sundays. TD Bank is also reserving the first hour of full-service branches and customer appointment bookings for seniors and those most at risk for the virus. You can check the status of branches by state on TD Bank’s COVID-19 updates page.

TD Bank ATMs are still accessible, as is its website and banking app.

Truist (formerly BB&T and SunTrust)

Truist, the result of a recent merger between BB&T and SunTrust, is offering its deposits customers temporarily-waived ATM surcharge fees.

For further assistance, Truist encourages heritage BB&T clients to call 1-800-226-5228 and heritage SunTrust clients to call 1-877-820-2103. Watch out for long wait times, however, which customers have reported on social media.

Local BB&T and SunTrust branch hours and services are temporarily moving to drive-thru teller services only, appointment-only in-person visits and select branch closures. Customers still have 24/7 access to ATMs as well as online, mobile and telephone banking.

U.S. Bank

U.S. Bank maintains that it is “actively looking for ways to help customers” who have been impacted. Deposits customers who have been financially affected by COVID-19 should call the bank at 1-888-287-7817.

U.S. Bank branch operations are temporarily reduced, and the bank encourages customers to use drive-up windows instead of going inside a branch. You can check your local branch’s hours and status online. Otherwise, you can still access your U.S. Bank accounts on the bank’s mobile app, by phone or on its website.

Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo has said it will offer fee waivers for customers who contact the company. On a larger scale, the Wells Fargo Foundation has pledged up to $6.25 million in donations “to support domestic and global response to the COVID-19 and to aid public health relief efforts.” This includes funding “at the local level,” as well as for the national CDC and the International Medical Corps.

Select Wells Fargo locations are temporarily closed, while the branches that remain open have temporarily reduced hours. You can check the status of a Wells Fargo branch here. If you need a service that can only be completed in a branch, you can make an appointment. Wells Fargo call centers still remain open, though they are experiencing higher-than-normal call volume and longer wait times.

You can also access your accounts online and on the Wells Fargo Mobile app, where you can deposit checks, move money and more. Wells Fargo also reminds customers that they can use contactless cards or digital wallets for payments.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

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Banking

How Much Will My Stimulus Check Be? Calculate Your Payment

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continues to batter the economy — prompting the stock market to plummet and unemployment claims to spike — the U.S. federal government is throwing taxpayers a life raft, in the form of stimulus checks.

Congress has passed a $2 trillion relief bill that aims to provide emergency assistance to individuals, families and businesses affected by the coronavirus pandemic, including one-time payments made to individuals. The amount of money you can expect to see from Uncle Sam, though, is based on a number of factors, ranging from how much money you make to how many children you have.

Who qualifies for a stimulus check?

Under the relief bill — dubbed the CARES Act — most adults who have a valid Social Security number will be able to qualify for a stimulus check, with the size of that check based on your 2019 or 2018 tax return.

You also qualify for a stimulus check if you receive Social Security benefits for disability, retirement or Supplemental Security Income, according to the AARP. Social Security recipients will not need to file 2019 taxes to receive their check as previously stated — instead, information will be based on 1099 forms.

In order to qualify, you need to meet the following requirements:

You must fall below income thresholds: The bulk of those who do not qualify for a stimulus check will likely be high-earners: Under the CARES Act, if you’re an individual with no children who earns over $99,000 or are a married couple that filed jointly and are making more than $198,000, you are not eligible to receive a stimulus check.

You cannot be claimed as a dependent of someone else: Additionally, in order to receive a stimulus check, you cannot be claimed as a dependent of someone else. That’s noteworthy, and may mean that millions of dependents who are not children under the age of 17 could end up missing out on relief checks. As the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities points out, filers only receive an additional $500 for each child under 17, which could be problematic for people who support dependents like the elderly, adults with disabilities and college students.

You must have a valid Social Security number: To receive a rebate check, each member of the household (including children) is also required to have a valid Social Security number. Per the Center on Budget Policy and Priorities, this may mean that households of certain immigrant families with children who are U.S. citizens could still be denied a stimulus check.

How much are the stimulus checks?

The amount of your stimulus check is based off of your adjusted gross income, as well as how many children under the age of 17 you have. Here’s how the one-time, non-taxable payments break down:

  • Up to $1,200 per adult
  • Up to $2,400 for couples filing joint returns
  • $500 per child under the age of 17

However, the checks start to decrease by $5 for every additional $100 of income beyond the following income thresholds:

  • $75,000 for individuals
  • $112,500 for head of households (typically single parents)
  • $150,000 for couples who filed a joint return

Certain individuals with higher adjustable gross incomes aren’t eligible to receive a stimulus check at all. The checks completely phase out at the following income thresholds:

  • $99,000 for individuals with no children
  • $198,000 for married couples with no children

How does the government determine how much I get?

The government will determine the size of your cash payment based on the adjusted gross income (or your total gross income minus certain deductions, such as 401(k) contributions) and information reported on your 2019 tax return. For those who have not filed a 2019 tax return, tax returns from 2018 may be used instead to determine your check amount.

If you don’t typically file taxes and have no income — and instead rely on Social Security benefits — you are still eligible to receive a stimulus check. Instead of using information from your 2018 or 2019 taxes, the IRS will use information from Social Security beneficiaries’ 1099 documents.

“Social Security recipients who are not typically required to file a tax return need to take no action, and will receive their payment directly to their bank account,” Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said in a statement.

When will I get my stimulus check?

According to the CARES Act, the cash payments should be made as “rapidly as possible.” On March 30, the IRS announced that the distribution of the payments will begin within the next three weeks.

It’s also worth noting that if you have signed up for direct deposit with the IRS and have chosen to have your tax refunds deposited electronically — as opposed to receiving your tax refunds by mail as a paper check — you will likely receive your stimulus check faster, too.

Still, experts have been critical of that timeline, and have instead said the payment process could take months, not weeks. In 2009, for example, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) took three months to send out checks to households as a cushion during the Great Recession.

How will I receive my stimulus check?

You can expect your stimulus check from the IRS to be either directly deposited into your bank account or mailed to you, based on the method in which you requested to receive your tax refund. However, the IRS also announced that in the coming weeks, the Treasury Department plans to open a web-based portal in which people can share their banking information with the IRS, enabling them to receive their payments via direct deposit as opposed to waiting for a check in the mail.

If you have filed your 2019 or 2018 taxes, there is no action needed from you, and the IRS will issue your payment automatically. In fact, the IRS is actually asking consumers not to contact them about the stimulus checks, stating it will make details available on its website.

Determine how much you will get from your stimulus check

To find out how much you can expect to receive from your stimulus check, reference the table below.

What you should do with your stimulus check

As many Americans face furlough or unemployment as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, a recent survey by MagnifyMoney found that most people intend to use their stimulus checks on necessities, like paying bills and buying groceries.

Many experts recommend keeping the money you receive from your rebate liquid, like in an emergency savings account, which should have enough funds to cover three to six months’ worth of living expenses.

For more information on the rest of the stimulus package, refer to our hub page.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.