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How to Make Money in Stocks

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Putting money in the market is well-worn financial advice for a reason: Investing in stocks is one of the best steps you can take toward building wealth.But how, exactly, is that wealth built? How is money earned by purchasing stock market holdings, and what can you do to maximize the gains you make from your own portfolio?

How to make money in stocks: 5 best practices

The way the stock market works — and works for you — is as simple as a high school economics class. It’s all about supply and demand, and the way those factors affect value.

Investors purchase market assets like stocks (shares of companies), which increase in value when the company does well. As the company in question makes financial progress, more investors want a piece of the action, and they’re willing to pay more for an individual share.

That means that the share you paid for has now increased in price, thanks to higher demand — which in turn means you can earn something when it comes time to sell it. (Of course, it’s also possible for stocks and other market holdings to decrease in value, which is why there’s no such thing as a risk-free investment.)

Along with the profit you can make by selling stocks, you can also earn shareholder dividends, or portions of the company’s earnings. Cash dividends are usually paid on a quarterly basis, but you might also earn dividends in the form of additional shares of stock.

Micro-mechanics of how stocks earn money aside, you likely won’t see serious growth without heeding some basic market principles and best practices. Here’s how to ensure your portfolio will do as much work for you as possible.

1. Take advantage of time

Although it’s possible to make money on the stock market in the short term, the real earning potential comes from the compound interest you earn on long-term holdings. As your assets increase in value, the total amount of money in your account grows, making room for even more capital gains. That’s how stock market earnings increase over time exponentially.

But in order to best take advantage of that exponential growth, you need to start building your portfolio as early as possible. Ideally, you’ll want to start investing as soon as you’re earning an income — perhaps by taking advantage of a company-sponsored 401(k) plan.

To see exactly how much time can affect your nest egg, let’s look at an example. Say you stashed $1,000 in your retirement account at age 20, with plans to hang up your working hat at age 70. Even if you put nothing else into the account, you’d have over $18,000 to look forward to after 50 years of growth, assuming a relatively modest 6% interest rate. But if you waited until you were 60 to make that initial deposit, you’d earn less than $800 through compound interest — which is why it’s so much harder to save for retirement if you don’t start early. Plus, all that extra cash comes at no additional effort on your part. It just requires time — so go ahead and get started!

2. Continue to invest regularly

Time is an important component of your overall portfolio growth. But even decades of compounding returns can only do so much if you don’t continue to save.

Let’s go back to our retirement example above. Only this time, instead of making a $1,000 deposit and forgetting about it, let’s say you contributed $1,000 a year — which comes out to less than $20 per week.

If you started making those annual contributions at age 20, you’d have saved about $325,000 by the time you celebrated your 70th birthday. Even if you waited until 60 to start saving, you’d wind up with about $15,000 — a far cry from the measly $1,800 you’d take out if you only made the initial deposit.

Making regular contributions doesn’t have to take much effort; you can easily automate the process through your 401(k) or brokerage account, depositing a set amount each week or pay period.

3. Set it and forget it — mostly

If you’re looking to see healthy returns on your stock market investments, just remember — you’re playing the long game.

For one thing, short-term trading lacks the tax benefits you can glean from holding onto your investments for longer. If you sell a stock before owning it for a full year, you’ll pay a higher tax rate than you would on long-term capital gains — that is, stocks you’ve held for more than a year.

While there are certain situations that do call for taking a look at your holdings, for the most part, even serious market dips reverse themselves in time. In fact, these bearish blips are regular, expected events, according to Malik S. Lee, CFP® and founder of Atlanta-based Felton & Peel Wealth Management.

So-called market corrections are healthy, he said. “It shows that the market is alive and well.” And even taking major recessions into account, the market’s performance has had an overall upward trend over the past hundred years.

4. Maintain a diverse portfolio

All investing carries risk; it’s possible for some of the companies you invest in to underperform or even fold entirely. But if you diversify your portfolio, you’ll be safeguarded against losing all of your assets when investments don’t go as planned.

By ensuring you’re invested in many different types of securities, you’ll be better prepared to weather stock market corrections. It’s unlikely that all industries and companies will suffer equally or succeed at the same level, so you can hedge your bets by buying some of everything.

5. Consider hiring professional help

Although the internet makes it relatively easy to create a well-researched DIY stock portfolio, if you’re still hesitant to put your money in the market, hiring an investment advisor can help. Even though the use of a professional can’t mitigate all risk of losses, you might feel more comfortable knowing you have an expert in your corner.

How the stock market can grow your wealth

Given the right combination of time, contribution regularity and a little bit of luck, the stock market has the potential to turn even a modest savings into an appreciable nest egg.

Ready to get started investing for yourself? Check out the following MagnifyMoney articles:

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Jamie Cattanach
Jamie Cattanach |

Jamie Cattanach is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Jamie here

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Investing

Personal Capital vs Betterment: Which Robo-Advisor Is Best for You?

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

If you’re looking for a robo-advisor to handle your investments, two major players to consider are Personal Capital and Betterment. These two services offer a range of investment account types and beneficial features. However, they cater to very different customer groups.

Betterment has fewer investment options, but there are no account minimums and it has lower fees on smaller balances, making it an excellent option for new investors. By contrast, Personal Capital appeals to more seasoned investors. It requires customers to have at least $100,000 in investments, but the company offers individual stock investment options and more personalized attention.

We created a side-by-side comparison to help you differentiate between these two robo-advisors and choose the one that’s best for you.

Personal Capital vs Betterment: Feature comparison

Personal CapitalBetterment
Amount minimum to open account
  • $100,000
  • $0
Management fees
  • 0.89% for accounts of $100k - $1M
  • 0.79% for accounts of $1M - $3M
  • 0.69% for accounts between $3M and $5M; lower fees for accounts over $5M
  • 0.25% for Digital offering (no minimum account balance)
  • 0.40% for Premium offering ($100,000 minimum account balance)
Account fees (annual, transfer, inactivity)
  • $0 annual fee
  • $0 full account transfer fee
  • $0 partial account transfer fee
  • $0 inactivity fee
  • $0 annual fee
  • $0 full account transfer fee
  • $0 partial account transfer fee
  • $0 inactivity fee
Account types
  • Individual taxable
  • Traditional IRA
  • Roth IRA
  • Joint taxable
  • Rollover IRA
  • Rollover Roth IRA
  • SEP IRA
  • Trust
  • Individual taxable
  • Traditional IRA
  • Roth IRA
  • Joint taxable
  • Rollover IRA
  • Rollover Roth IRA
  • SEP IRA
  • Trust
Portfolio
  • Personal Capital offers 6 high-level asset classes.
  • 12 asset classes represented in ETF portfolio
Automatic rebalancing
Tax loss harvesting
Offers fractional shares
Ease of use
 
 
Mobile appiOS, AndroidiOS, Android
Customer supportPhone, 24/7 live support, Email, 5branch locationsPhone, Email

Personal Capital vs Betterment: Management fees

If you’re looking to invest your money, it’s important to pay attention to the fees robo-advisors charge; they can vary widely from company to company. Particularly if you don’t have a lot of money to invest, Personal Capital will be more expensive than Betterment, and it has a higher minimum investment.

Personal Capital’s robo-advisor option requires you to invest at least $100,000 to get started, and charges a tiered annual fee based on the assets you have under management. This fee covers the investment advice you receive, asset custody, and trade commissions:

  • Up to $1 million: 0.89%
  • First $3 million: 0.79%
  • Next $2 million: 0.69%
  • Next $5 million: 0.59%
  • Over $10 million: 0.49%

That is the only fee you’ll pay with Personal Capital; there are no transfer fees, inactivity fees, or monthly maintenance fees.

For new investors, Betterment provides excellent value with low fees. There is no account minimum to get started, and there is a 0.25% annual management fee for its Digital plan. If you have at least $100,000 invested and want more personalized attention, you can upgrade to Betterment’s Premium plan and gain over-the-phone access to financial experts. The Premium offering has a 0.40% annual management fee.

For investors with more assets, those fees can be even lower. If you have over $2 million under management through Betterment, your annual fee drops — to 0.15% for the Digital plan and 0.30% for the Premium plan — on the portion of your balance over $2 million.

With Betterment, your fee covers the cost of the advice you receive, transactions, trades, and account administration; there are no additional transaction fees.

Another factor to consider is the companies’ expense ratios — how fund’s assets are used for administrative or operational expenses. The higher the expense ratio, the lower your returns will be. Personal Capital reported that its average expense ratio is 0.08%. By contrast, Betterment posted that the average expense ratios of its recommended portfolios was 0.07% to 0.15%. Keep in mind that these expense ratios are dependent on your allocation, and is included solely for comparison’s sake.

Personal Capital vs Betterment: Special features

With both Personal Capital and Betterment, you can connect outside accounts to get a more complete picture of your finances and better plan for your financial goals accordingly.

However, Personal Capital offers more features for seasoned investors, including 24/7 call access, even on weekends. You’re also eligible for advice on 401(k) allocations and insights into your cash flow and spending.

If you have at least $200,000 invested with Personal Capital, you’ll get even more additional features, including two dedicated financial advisors, customizable investments in individual stocks and ETFs and planning services for saving for college. Once you have over $1 million in assets, you’ll get access to estate planning services, too.

By contrast, Betterment lacks many of those features. You can only invest in ETFs and not individual stocks, regardless of your investment level. And, while you can invest in individual investment accounts and IRAs with Betterment, you can’t create a college savings plan.

If you’re looking for a cash management option in addition to your investments, Personal Capital and Betterment both offer high-yield savings options. Note that the top option on our list of the best high-yield savings accounts does offer a better APY than either robo-advisor’s cash management account.

  • Betterment Everyday Savings: With Betterment’s Everyday Savings, you’ll earn 2.38% APY (as of Sept. 12, 2019); there are no fees. You’re also eligible for up to $1 million in FDIC insurance; funds are deposited in up to four partner banks, each offering $250,000 in coverage. If you elect to exclude certain partner banks from receiving deposits, your level of FDIC insurance may be lower.
  • Personal Capital Cash:Personal Capital Cash has no account minimum, and allows you to earn 2.05% APY (as of Sept. 12, 2019). Your money is also insured by the FDIC, and you’ll get six times the coverage of what most banks offer.
CompanyAccount NameAPY
Personal CapitalPersonal Capital Cash2.05%
BettermentBetterment Everyday Savings2.39%
VioBankOnline Savings Account2.52%

Personal Capital’s advantages

  • Personalized attention: As a Personal Capital customer, you get access to a 24/7 customer service line and can talk to a financial advisory team. As your investments grow, you will also get access to two dedicated financial advisors.
  • Individual securities: With Personal Capital, you can invest in individual stocks, not just ETFs.
  • Socially-conscious investment options: Personal Capital’s Socially Responsible Personal Strategy program seeks out companies that are positively impacting environmental, social, and governance issues.
  • College planning: Personal Capital offers an Education Planning tool you can use to plan for college costs, including determining how much you need to save each year to pay for school.
  • Tax optimization: Personal Capital works to optimize your tax bill by avoiding mutual funds and allocating high-yield stocks and fixed income into tax-deferred or exempt accounts. It also engages in tax loss harvesting, using individual securities to offset gains or qualify for a deduction.

Betterment’s advantages

  • Low account minimums: Betterment doesn’t have an account minimum, so you can start investing with just $1, rather than having to wait until you’ve saved enough money.
  • Fractional shares: Betterment allows you to purchase fractional shares, so you’re able to invest your entire deposit.
  • Hands-off investing: Betterment is perfect for investors who want to set-it-and-forget-it. You can make an initial deposit, set up recurring investments, then allow Betterment to do the heavy lifting by rebalancing your account for you based on your risk tolerance.
  • Charitable investing: With Betterment, you can donate shares rather than cash to partner charities including UNICEF, Feeding America, Wounded Warrior Family Support, and GiveWell. Not only will you be able to help a worthy charity, but you’ll also avoid the capital gains tax on the sale of your investment.

Personal Capital vs Betterment: Which is best for you?

When it comes to deciding between Personal Capital and Betterment, think about your current financial situation and your future goals.

If you’re new to investing, don’t have much money to deposit or want to be a hands-off investor, Betterment is likely the better choice for you. It offers lower fees, has no account minimum, and completely manages your investments for you. Plus, you can invest in fractional shares, making every dollar work harder for you.

If you have at least $100,000 to invest, and need more personalized attention or assistance with saving for college or estate planning, Personal Capital may be a better fit. Personal Capital has higher fees than Betterment, but you get 24/7 access to support staff, and you can even talk with dedicated financial advisors.

If you’re still exploring your investment options, make sure you check out the best robo-advisors of 2019.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Kat Tretina
Kat Tretina |

Kat Tretina is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Kat here

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Investing

The Best Investment Apps of 2019

Editorial Note: The content of this article is based on the author’s opinions and recommendations alone. It has not been previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any of our network partners.

Investing in the market used to require a dedicated workstation with reports and research piled high, from where you would call in your stock picks like a general ordering an air strike. Today the ubiquity of smartphones has made investing only a little more complicated than ordering a pizza, a level of convenience that makes it easier than ever for Americans to start putting their money to work in the market.

But with investment apps sprouting like mushrooms in the iOS and Android app stores, each claiming to offer the lowest fees and tons of cutting-edge market research, it’s not easy to choose which one is right for you. Finding an investment app you’ll be happy with requires matching your investment strategy and habits with the app that fits best. We’ve done some of the leg work for you by evaluating the most highly-regarded investing apps out there.

Best investment apps for active investors

Whether or not you’re an active investor has less to do with the volume of trading in which you engage — although that’s a factor — and more with how willing you are to dive into the nitty-gritty of picking specific investments. If you love to make individual stock picks and spend hours poring over news and rumors about where the market may move next, you’re likely an active investor.

AppsFee per tradeAccount Minimum
J.P. Morgan$2.95$0
Robinhood$0$0
Fidelity$4.95$0
Stockpile$0$0
Charles Schwab$4.95$0

J.P. Morgan You Invest

JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A You’re probably familiar with the name J.P. Morgan, given J.P. Morgan Chase is one of the biggest players in the financial industry. But you shouldn’t feel intimidated by their You Invest app, which provides users with reams of research in order to help you make educated calls when it comes to investing. You Invest also provides 100 free trades for one year, which can be a nice incentive to start the process for new users.

  • Fee per trade: $2.95 per trade ($0 if you’re a client of Chase Private Client, Chase Sapphire Banking, J.P. Morgan Private Bank or J.P. Morgan Securities).
  • Account fees: There’s a $75 full account transfer fee and a $75 partial account transfer fee, but no annual maintenance fee or inactive account fee.
  • Securities traded: Stocks, ETFs, mutual funds and bonds.

This app is good for: Investors who like the idea of directing trades themselves but still feel they need more education and data should take a look at J.P. Morgan You Invest, as it offers some of the best educational tools out there.

This app is bad for: Investors planning on being extremely active with their trading. Although $2.95 per trade is fairly cheap, there are certain discount brokers that offer lower pricing on high-volume trading.

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Robinhood

Robinhood Markets Inc While lacking the storied history of J.P. Morgan, Robinhood has achieved a great deal of fame in a short amount of time, thanks in part to its zero-fee trades. However, don’t expect this app to hold your hand with research materials and educational tools, as Robinhood is focused on the basics, which means there’s not much to do on the app besides trade.

  • Fees per trade: $0.
  • Account fees: There’s a $75 full account transfer fee, but other than that, no fees are associated with the account.
  • Securities traded: Stocks, ETFs, options and cryptocurrencies.

This app is good for: The biggest selling point of Robinhood is the lack of a fee per trade, meaning it should appeal to either beginning investors looking to get their feet wet or experienced stock traders wanting a handy way to move a large volume of trades on the go.

This app is bad for: Investors hoping for a lot of depth in the securities they can trade or types of accounts available will be disappointed by Robinhood — currently you can only invest in basic securities and taxable accounts (meaning no IRAs). Also if you need any sort of guidance about which stocks to invest in, you won’t receive it from Robinhood.

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Fidelity

Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC A broker with more than 70 years of experience, Fidelity offers a mobile app that’s the equivalent of keeping a miniaturized broker in your jeans’ pocket. The app gives account holders access to the day’s news regarding the market, a snapshot of how your investments are performing, the ability to trade at the push of a button and even an option to call a real broker if you need a consultation.

  • Fees per trade: $4.95.
  • Account fees: None.
  • Securities traded: Stocks, ETFs, mutual funds, bonds, options, futures and commodities, foreign currencies, cryptocurrencies.

This app is good for: Investors looking for a full-service broker offering a wide variety of securities to trade should take a hard look at Fidelity‘s mobile app. Given the lack of account fees and the reasonable $4.95 per trade, this app will likely hit the sweet spot for investors wanting the full investment experience while on the go.

This app is bad for: Those looking for an ultra cheap fee per trade may be disappointed with Fidelity‘s $4.95 fee.

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Stockpile

StockpileStockpile‘s unique offering is the ability to buy gift cards of stock for individual companies, allowing you to pass along the cards to a lucky recipient. It’s a clever way for parents to get their children started investing at the next birthday party, but Stockpile also has a mobile app that allows customers to trade stocks and ETFs. Stockpile allows you to invest in fractional shares, but the variety of securities is limited compared to what you can get with other brokers.

  • Fee per trade: $0.99 per trade when using Stockpile’s app to buy and sell securities. Fees for electronic and physical gift cards run higher and can be found here.
  • Account fees: None.
  • Securities traded: A limited selection of stocks and ETFs.

This app is good for: True novices who want to begin dabbling with investing or those investors interested in fractional stocks. Investors happy with the stocks and ETFs available from Stockpile and want to engage in lots of trading will also be happy with the $0.99 per trade fee, one of the lowest available.

This app is bad for: Any investor who wants a robust list of securities to choose from.

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Charles Schwab

The Charles Schwab Corporation One of the original discount brokers, Charles Schwab still offers its customers a relatively low fee per trade while still providing plenty of bells and whistles expected of a larger broker. The Schwab Mobile app gives users a live news feed from CNBC, allows the trading of stocks, ETFs, mutual funds, and options, and lets you transfer funds between Schwab brokerage accounts.

  • Fee per trade: $4.95.
  • Account fees: None.
  • Securities traded: Stocks, ETFs, mutual funds and options.

This app is good for: Investors looking to trade with one of the most reputable discount brokers around and who need lots of research and education to help guide their trades.

This app is bad for: People who want to trade more exotic securities over a mobile app, such as foreign currencies.

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Best investment apps for hands-off investors

Many investors aren’t looking to micromanage their investments and prefer a more passive approach. The apps offered by the brokers and robo-advisors below will allow you to select a portfolio or investment strategy for your money, which is managed automatically to help you achieve your goals.

Robo-AdvisorsManagement FeeAccount Minimum
Wealthfront0.25%$500
Personal Capital0.89%$100,000
M1 Finance0.00%$100
Acorns$1 per month$0
Betterment0.25%$0

Wealthfront

Wealthfront Advisers LLCWealthfront provides a wide variety of account types, from IRAs to 529 college plans, which means that there is likely something for everyone. The relatively low fees associated with this robo-advisor, plus its ease of use and ability to show you all of your investment accounts (not just the ones you have at Wealthfront) at a glance makes it one of the world’s top robo-advisors.

  • Management fee: Annual fee of 0.25% of your account balance.
  • Account fees: None.
  • Account minimum: $500.

This app is good for: Investors who don’t mind paying $500 to open an account and want to invest in funds with low expense ratios — Wealthfront promises none of their funds have expense ratios exceeding 0.16%.

This app is bad for: Individuals who do not want to commit to the account minimum. The $500 account minimum isn’t very expensive, but many of Wealthfront‘s competitors in the robo-advisor space have no account minimums. Those looking to get started in investing with the spare change in their pocket should look elsewhere.

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Personal Capital

Personal Capital Corporation The Personal Capital investment app takes the features of an investment advisor and the tracking and monitoring capabilities of a budgeting app, like Mint, to give you a holistic view of your net worth. Investing with Personal Capital means an actual human being will manage your portfolio, but that comes with higher fees than you would get with a robo-advisor.

  • Management fee: Annual fee of 0.89% on account balances up to $1 million. When you invest more than $1 million, Personal Capital adjusts its annual fee based on a tiered fee structure.
  • Account fees: None
  • Account minimum: $100,000

This app is good for: Wealthy individuals looking for an app that provides the type of personal care and attention they would expect with the considerable size of the investment they are making.

This app is bad for: Obviously anyone who doesn’t have at least $100,000 to invest. Don’t worry, there are plenty of other great options for investors lacking a six-figure savings account.

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M1 Finance

M1 FinanceOne of the most alluring features of the M1 Finance robo-advisor is its fee structure — it has virtually no fees. That means you won’t pay an annual management fee or a fee per trade. Coupled with the low $100 minimum needed to start investing with the account, this price structure makes M1 Finance a good choice for those who want to start investing without having a lot of extra money lying around. With M1 Finance, you can either build a custom portfolio of stocks and ETFs, or choose from more than 80 expert portfolios managed by the app. In addition, you can invest in fractional shares.

  • Management fee: $0.00.
  • Account fees: There’s a $20 inactivity fee for accounts with $20 or less for a period of 90 days or more. There’s also a $100 transfer fee if you’re taking money from your M1 account to another broker.
  • Account minimum: $100 — while you can technically open an account with less than $100, you won’t begin investing until you reach this threshold.

This app is good for: Those looking for low fees will be happy with M1 Finance’s pricing, especially those who just want to invest in basic securities such as stocks and ETFs.

This app is bad for: Investors wanting to branch out beyond stocks and ETFs will be disappointed, as those are the only securities supported by M1 Finance’s platform. M1 Finance also lacks tax-loss harvesting, a money-saving feature commonly found with other robo-advisors.

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Acorns

Acorns Advisers, LLC The Acorns robo-advisor may be the ultimate “set it and forget it” app, with the idea being that the spare change from your everyday purchases ends up invested in your portfolio instead of gathering dust on your bedside table. Users who sign up for the app sync Acorns with their checking account and credit cards, and their purchases are rounded up to the nearest dollar – the “spare change” going into a portfolio that you’ve already selected. If you want to start building retirement savings, Acorns Later is an IRA account that works in sync with the basic account functionality.

  • Management fee: $1 per month for Acorns Core investing account. Additional pricing: $2 per month for Acorns Core + Acorns Later, the company’s IRA account product; $3 per month for Acorns Core + Acorns Later + Acorns Spend, the company’s cash management account.
  • Account fees: None.
  • Account minimum: None.

This app is good for: People who want to start investing but don’t really want to put any effort into it. Once you set it up, Acorns automatically takes care of investing your spare change so there’s no chance that you’ll forget to put your money to work.

This app is bad for: Those looking for either the cheapest pricing structure or the most control over their investments may not be happy with Acorns. $1 a month for the basic investment account doesn’t sound like a lot (and it’s not), but when represented as a percentage those 12 dollars a year can far exceed the 0.25% annual fee charged by Wealthfront, for example, depending on how much you invest.

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Betterment

Betterment Holdings Inc.Betterment has recently branched out into savings and checking accounts, but still remains focused on robo-advising for interested investors. Investing this way is completely passive — you’re not picking the ETFs in your portfolio, but trusting Betterment and its algorithm to make the right call based on the goals and preferences you share with the company. Investing $100,000 or more gets you access to Betterment’s premium account, which includes in-depth advice on investments outside of Betterment, plus consultations with an investment professional to build a plan for managing 401(k)s, real estate and individual stocks.

  • Management fee: 0.25% annual fee for basic investing account; 0.40% annual fee for a premium account that gives you more access to broker advice and other features.
  • Account fees: None.
  • Account minimum: None for the basic account; $100,000 for the premium account.

This app is good for: Passive investors who may also be interested in the savings and checking accounts Betterment is rolling out.

This app is bad for: Someone looking to fine-tune their investments beyond the options presented by Betterment.

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Investing app FAQs

The investing apps for hands-on investors reviewed above give you control over your investments anytime, anywhere. You can trade and sell investments with just a few taps on your phone screen.

Apps for hands-off investors offer low fees and manage your investments for you, removing some of the guesswork and confusion that plague beginning investors. These apps can choose investments that fit your goals, without requiring you to do tons of homework or research.

Micro-investing apps like Acorns and Stockpile lower the barrier to entry. Instead of needing hundreds or thousands of dollars to start investing, you can invest with very small amounts, in fractional shares. You can make small recurring deposits with your spare change, so you can invest without having to remember to set aside money each month.

Some investment accounts have limited account options, offering just stock or even pre-baked ETF portfolios, so you may not always be able to open a tax-deferred account like an IRA. And because you’re investing relatively small amounts, it’s possible you won’t be setting aside enough money for your future. As your financial situation improves, it’s important to re-evaluate your investment strategies and goals and contribute enough money to reach those milestones.

Robo-advisors are based on algorithms that build and manage investment portfolios for online brokers and investment apps. Robo-advisor accounts may have lower account minimums and low fees, making them a low-cost choice for new investors. These accounts automatically rebalance your investments as needed to take advantage of market changes, helping you build wealth without demanding that you pay attention to markets.

As you decide which investment app to use, keep these factors in mind:

  • Fees: Many investment apps charge trading fees, which can eat away at your returns. Look for an app that offers low fees — some even offer $0 trades.
  • Promotions: To attract your business, some investment apps offer promotional offers, such as 500 commission-free trades with a qualifying deposit, which can help you save money on your investments.
  • Account minimums: While some investment apps allow you to get started with as little as $0, others require much larger deposits, which may make it difficult to get started.
  • Range of assets: Look for an investment app that has a range of assets to choose from, such as mutual funds, stocks, bonds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs).

Each app has its own unique range of assets you can buy and sell. Some allow you to invest in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and ETFs, while others may offer only one class of assets. Before you invest your money, make sure you understand what investment options are available and choose the ones that make the most sense for your individual situation.

If the company is part of the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC) — nearly all major investment firms are — your investments are protected up to $500,000 if the company goes out of business. Keep in mind, though, that insurance does not cover you if the market falls. There are no guarantees when it comes to investing – you could end up losing money as the market changes.

The great thing about some of these investment apps is that you don’t need a lot of money to get started. In fact, apps like Acorns, Stash, and Robinhood allow you to get started with just a few dollars; after that, you simply invest your spare change. Over time, those small amounts will grow, helping you build your savings.

A perk of using investment apps is that they make investing simple. You don’t have to understand market fluctuations or have an in-depth knowledge of past stock performance to get started. Investment apps usually have robo-advisors and carefully picked investments that do all the hard work for you. Just set up your initial investment and recurring deposits, and you can be a mostly hands-off investor without stressing about managing the account yourself.

About our ranking

Please see below for the full list of apps considered for this review. The investment apps were evaluated based on the rating they received from the iOS and Android stores, the fees associated with each app and investment account, and the range and quality of the investment experience.

All apps considered:

Acorns
Ally Forex
Ally Invest
Ally Invest Managed Portfolios
Betterment
Charles Schwab
Charles Schwab Intelligent Portfolios
E-Trade
E-Trade Core Portfolios
Power E-Trade-Advanced Trading
eOption
eToro
Fidelity
Fidelity Go
Firstrade
Fundrise
Interactive Brokers
J.P. Morgan You Invest
J2TX – Invest ETH
Just2Trade
Just2Trade 0 vs. 2.50
Just2Trade Pro
M1 Finance
Merrill Edge
Merrill Guided Investing
My Merrill
MoneyLion
Motif
Nadex
Personal Capital
Robinhood
SigFig
SoFi Invest
SogoTrade
Stash
Stockpile
TastyWorks
TD Ameritrade
TD Ameritrade Essential Portfolios
TD Ameritrade Mobile Trader
TD Ameritrade Thinkorswim
TradeStation
TradeStation Futures Plus
USAA Investments
Vanguard
Vanguard Personal Advisor Services
Wealthfront
Wealthsimple
WiseBanyan
Zacks Trade

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James Ellis
James Ellis |

James Ellis is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email James here