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The Pumpkin Spice Tax: Retailers Charge More, Shoppers Get Less for Pumpkin-Flavored Products

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Cue the pumpkin spice tax rebellion.

A MagnifyMoney analysis of pumpkin spice-flavored items at several grocery stores and coffee shops found that customers often pay a premium for that perennial autumn flavor — in essence, a “pumpkin spice tax” that can be up to 133 percent higher on a per-unit (ounces) basis.

In the study, we compared the prices of the pumpkin spice and standard flavors of more than 200 food and beverage items at a half-dozen Manhattan-area retailers and restaurants in late September. We reviewed items in person at Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Fairway, CVS, Starbucks, Pret a Manger, Panera, Dunkin’ Donuts and McDonald’s. We supplemented our findings with a review of products at three online retailers — Walmart.com, Target.com and FreshDirect.com.

Pumpkin spice mania has reached a fever pitch in recent years, as retailers have rushed to incorporate the flavor into just about every item in our pantries — from cookies and cereals to bagels and waffle mixes.

Not only are some retailers charging significant surcharges on pumpkin spice-flavored products, but consumers are often paying more and getting less in return.

Read on for our full analysis. Or skip ahead to:

Retailer Spotlights:

Key Findings:

The average pumpkin spice rate: Across the roughly 200 products reviewed, we found an average pumpkin spice tax rate of 7.98% (per ounce/unit). That rate could be many times higher depending on the retailer. At Trader Joe’s, for example, the average pumpkin spice tax rate was 62%.

Pumpkin spice fans often pay more for less. Many retailers don’t just charge more for seasonal items — they give shoppers less product for their money. On FreshDirect.com, for example, a 6.5-oz. Pumpkin Pie Spice version of Land O’Lakes Spreadable Butter sold for $2.99, while the 8-oz. Land O’Lakes Spreadable Butter With Canola Oil sold for about 10 cents less, or $2.89. On a price per ounce basis, the Pumpkin pie spice option sold at a 28 percent premium. We found many more examples of retailers charging more for pumpkin-flavored products but offering less product.

Trader Joe’s was the worst pumpkin spice tax offender. Some retailers are more aggressive with pumpkin spice surcharges than others.. It claimed three of the top 10 highest pumpkin spice tax rates in our study. Among 10 products analyzed at Trader Joe’s, for example, we found an average pumpkin spice tax rate of 62%. By comparison, the average pumpkin spice tax rate at Target.com was just 14% across 20 items.

Coffee drinkers’ highest pumpkin spice premium? Welcome to Starbucks. The highest tax on the seasonal coffee drink was charged by the Pumpkin Spice Latte’s originator, Starbucks. The coffee chain charged $5.25 for its 16-oz. Pumpkin Spice Latte — exactly one dollar more than its 16-oz. Caffe Latte, sold for $4.25, in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood. That’s an effective pumpkin spice tax rate of 23.53%.

McDonald’s, Dunkin’ Donuts and Whole Foods don’t charge a seasonal premium on most items. MagnifyMoney observed no significant pumpkin spice premium on any of the 10 seasonal items we identified at Whole Foods Market. Nor did we observe a premium on pumpkin spice drink options at McDonald’s or Dunkin’ Donuts.

The Top 10 Pumpkin Spice Tax Rates

Across all items reviewed, millennial-centric retailer Trader Joe’s charged the highest premiums on its pumpkin-flavored products. It claimed three of the top 10 highest pumpkin spice tax rates in our study.

The retailer is also one of several in our study that not only charges more for pumpkin-spice products but often offers less product by weight as well. That means shoppers are spending more but getting much less for their money.

Take Trader Joe’s Pumpkin Pancake and Waffle Mix as one example. The national chain charged $1.99 for its 32-ounce Buttermilk Pancake and Waffle Mix and $2.99 for its 21.2-ounce Pumpkin Pancake and Waffle Mix variation — $1 more for a product with 10 fewer ounces.

Based on the sticker price alone, shoppers may think they paid 50% more for the pumpkin spice version. But on a price-per-ounce basis, they paid more than twice the price — an effective pumpkin spice tax rate of 133%.

Trader Joe’s certainly wasn’t the only retailer taking advantage of the pumpkin spice hype.

At first glance, a Target.com shopper might see no difference in the price of Nabisco’s Oreos vs. the pumpkin spice version. As of late September, they had the same sticker price of $2.99. But the pumpkin spice version came with just 10.7 ounces — 3.6 ounces less than the original flavor. On a price per ounce basis, that’s an effective pumpkin spice tax rate of 33%.

See some of the highest-taxed items below. Percentages may be rounded, and list prices are used for comparisons. Per-unit cost is based on per-ounce figures where available, or per unit/count):

Pumpkin Spice Tax

Retailer

Product

Sticker Price

Price Per Oz./Unit

Per Oz./Unit

Sticker Price

1. Trader Joe's

Buttermilk Pancake
and waffle mix — 32 oz.

$1.99

$0.06

133%

50.25%

Pumpkin Pancake and
waffle mix — 21.2 oz.

$2.99

$0.14

2. Trader Joe's

Joe Joe's cookies —
20 oz.

$2.99

$0.15

87%

0.00%

Pumpkin Joe Joe's —
10.5 oz.

$2.99

$0.28

3. Trader Joe's

Joes O's —
15 oz.

$1.99

$0.13

69%

35.18%

Pumpkin O's —
12 oz.

$2.69

$0.22

4. Walmart.com

Twinings of London
Winter Holiday Spiced
Apple Chai, K-Cup
Portion Pack — 12 ct.

$8.11

$0.68

59%

60.17%

Twinings Pumpkin
Spice Chai Tea Keurig
K-Cups — 12 ct.

$12.99

$1.08

5. Target.com

Archer Farms Dark Chocolate Almonds — 13 oz.

$5.99

$0.46

59%

-33.4%

Archer Farms Pumpkin Spice Almonds — 5.5 oz.

$3.99

$0.73

6. Target.com

Krusteaz Honey
Cornbread & Muffin
Mix — 15 oz.

$1.67

$0.11

36.4%

35.9%

Krusteaz Pumpkin
Spice Muffin
Mix — 15 oz.

$2.27

$0.15

7. Target.com

Oreo Original
Chocolate Sandwich
Cookies — 14.3 oz.

$2.99

$0.21

33%

0.00%

Oreo Pumpkin
Spice Creme Sandwich
Cookies — 10.7 oz.

$2.99

$0.28

8. FreshDirect

Land O'Lakes
Spreadable Butter With
Canola Oil — 8 oz.

$2.89

$0.36

28%

3.46%

Land O'Lakes
Spreadable Butter,
Pumpkin Pie
Spice — 6.5 oz.

$2.99

$0.46

9. Walmart.com

Victor Allen's
Coffee Donut Shop
Blend Medium Roast
Single Serve Brew
Cups — 0.35 oz., 12 ct.

$3.25

$0.27

26%

26.8%

Victor Allen's Coffee
Pumpkin Spice Medium
Roast Single Serve Brew
Cups — 0.34 oz., 12 ct.

$4.12

$0.34

10. Walmart.com

Entenmann's Dark
Roast Coffee Single Serve
Cups — 0.35 oz, 10 ct.

$6.99

$0.69

23.2%

21.6%

Entenmann's Coffee
Pumpkin Spice Cups —
10 ct.

$8.50

$0.85

The above items were reviewed in-person at retailers in the Chelsea area of Manhattan on Sept. 22 and with online retailers on Sept. 25-26.

The Pumpkin Spice Latte Tax

Some may notice that the coveted pumpkin spice latte (PSL) — made popular by Starbucks after its debut in fall 2003 and now offered by coffee shops worldwide — typically carries a noticeable mark-up.

Starbucks’ grande-size PSL, for example, is sold at a 23.5% premium above the price of its non-pumpkiny caffe latte counterpart.

Pret a Manger and Panera also charge more for pumpkin lattes, although neither quite as high as Starbucks.

What you ultimately pay for your PSL may simply come down to how you like your coffee. You won’t pay a PSL tax at McDonald’s or Dunkin’ Donuts, but If you prefer Starbucks or Panera, paying the premium may be worth what you get.

Here’s what it will cost you to buy a 16-ounce pumpkin spice latte at some prominent national coffee chains in the Chelsea section of Manhattan.

Coffee Shop

Product

Sticker
Price

Pumpkin Spice
Tax Rate

Starbucks

Caffe Latte
16 oz.

$4.25

23.53%

Pumpkin Spice Latte
16 oz.

$5.25

Pret A Manger

Latte
16 oz.

$3.59

13.93%

Spiced Pumpkin Latte
16 oz.

$4.09

Starbucks

Chai Latte
16 oz.

$4.45

11.24%

Pumpkin Spice Chai Latte
16 oz.

$4.95

Panera Bread

Caffe Latte
16 oz.

$4.09

4.89%

Pumpkin Spice Latte
16 oz.

$4.29

Dunkin’ Donuts

Latte
16 oz.

$2.99

0.00%

Pumpkin Flavored Latte
16 oz.

$2.99

McDonald’s

Latte
16 oz.

$2.59

0.00%

Pumpkin Spice Latte
16 oz.

$2.59

The above items were reviewed in-person at retailers in the Chelsea area of Manhattan on Sept. 22.

Retailer Spotlight: Trader Joe’s

As mentioned above, America’s favorite grocery store after Publix and Wegmans had the highest-taxed seasonal items in our analysis.

Among the highest-taxed items: Trader Joe’s Pumpkin Pancake and Waffle Mix — costing much more per ounce than TJ’s Buttermilk Pancake and Waffle Mix — and Joe Joe’s cookies.

Both the seasonal and nonseasonal Joe Joe’s are priced at $2.99 on the sticker. However, the seasonal Pumpkin Joe Joe’s cost 28 cents per ounce, while the regular Joe Joe’s cost 15 cents an ounce. In this case, customers pay almost double per ounce — something like the same price for half the cookies.

MagnifyMoney reached out to Trader Joe’s for comment but did not receive a response.

See below for a breakdown of some products.

Trader Joe's

Pumpkin Spice Tax

Product

Sticker Price

Price Per Oz./Unit

Per Oz./Unit

Sticker Price

Buttermilk pancake and
waffle mix — 32 oz.

$1.99

$0.06

133%

50.25%

Pumpkin pancake and waffle mix — 21.2 oz.

$2.99

$0.14

Joe Joe's cookies — 20 oz.

$2.99

$0.15

87%

0.00%

Pumpkin Joe Joe's — 10.5 oz.

$2.99

$0.28

Joes O's — 15 oz.

$1.99

$0.13

69%

35.18%

Pumpkin O's — 12 oz.

$2.69

$0.22

Plain bagels — 6 ct.

$2.29

$0.38

10.5%

8.73%

Pumpkin bagels — 6 ct.

$2.49

$0.42

Gluten-free buttermilk
pancake mix — 18 oz.

$3.99

$0.22

9.1%

12.53%

Gluten-free pumpkin
pancake mix — 18.5 oz.

$4.49

$0.24

The above items were reviewed in-person at the Trader Joe’s at 675 6th Ave. in New York City on Sept. 22.

Retailer Spotlight: Target

We found the highest seasonal-item, per-unit “tax” at Target.com on chocolate-covered pumpkin spice almonds.

At first glance, the seasonal almonds look cheaper than the comparable dark chocolate-covered almonds, sold in a larger package. When you look closer, you realize the pumpkin spice almonds are sold for almost 60 percent more per ounce. However, it’s important to note the discrepancy could be due to the difference in packaging.

MagnifyMoney contacted Target for comment but did not receive a response.

See below for a breakdown of the PST applied online at Target.com.

Target.com

Pumpkin Spice Tax

Product

Sticker Price

Price Per Oz./Unit

Per Oz./Unit

Sticker Price

Archer Farms Dark Chocolate Almonds — 13 oz.

$5.99

$0.46

59%

-33.4%

Archer Farms Pumpkin Spice Almonds
— 5.5 oz.

$3.99

$0.73

Krusteaz Honey Cornbread &
Muffin Mix — 15 oz.

$1.67

$0.11

36.4%

35.9%

Krusteaz Pumpkin Spice
Muffin Mix — 15 oz.

$2.27

$0.15

Oreo Original Chocolate
Sandwich Cookies — 14.3 oz.

$2.99

$0.21

33%

0.00%

Oreo Pumpkin Spice Creme
Sandwich Cookies — 10.7 oz.

$2.99

$0.28

International Delight® French
Vanilla Singles Coffee Creamer — 24 ct.

$2.64

$0.11

18.2%

20.8%

International Delight Pumpkin
Spice Coffee Creamer — 24 ct.

$3.19

$0.13

Tazo Organic Tea Latte
Chai Black Tea — 32 fl. oz.

$3.14

$0.10

10%

11.2%

Tazo Chai Pumpkin Spice
Latte Tea Concentrate — 32 fl. oz.

$3.49

$0.11

Keurig Green Mountain Breakfast
Blend Light Roast Coffee — K-Cup Pods — 18 ct.

$10.99

$0.61

9.8%

9.1%

Keurig Green Mountain Coffee
Pumpkin Spice Coffee K-Cups — 18 ct.

$11.99

$0.67

KISSES Halloween Fall Harvest
Milk Chocolates — 11 oz./approx. 69 ct.

$3.59

$0.33

9.1%

0.00%

KISSES Halloween Fall Harvest
Pumpkin Spice — 10 oz./approx. 64 ct.

$3.59

$0.36

Tazo Chai Black Tea — 20 ct.

$3.14

$0.16

6.3%

11.2%

Tazo Chai Pumpkin Spice
Tea — 20 ct.

$3.49

$0.17

Quaker Fruit & Cream Instant
Oatmeal Variety — 8 ct.

$2.59

$0.32

6.25%

5.8%

Quaker Pumpkin Spice Instant
Oatmeal Limited Edition — 8 ct.

$2.74

$0.34

Archer Farms Antioxidant Trail Mix — 9 oz.

$5.99

$0.67

-50.7%

-50.1%

Archer Farms Trail Mix Pumpkin Spice —
9 oz.

$2.99

$0.33

The above items were reviewed online, at Target.com, on Sept. 25-26.

Retailer Spotlight: Walmart

At Walmart.com, the most-taxed item was tea. Specifically: Twinings of London’s Pumpkin Spice Chai Tea Keurig Cups. Compared with the brand’s Winter Holiday Spiced Apple Chai flavor, the pumpkin spice variant costs about 60 percent more for the same number of cups. MagnifyMoney contacted Walmart for comment but did not yet receive a response.

See below for a breakdown of the Pumpkin Spice Tax applied online at Walmart.com.

Walmart.com

Pumpkin Spice Tax

Product

Sticker Price

Price Per Oz./Unit

Per Oz./Unit

Sticker Price

Twinings of London Winter Holiday
Spiced Apple Chai, K-Cup Portion Pack — 12 ct.

$8.11

$0.68

59%

60.17%

Twinings Pumpkin Spice Chai Tea
Keurig K-Cups — 12 ct.

$12.99

$1.08

Victor Allen's Coffee Donut Shop
Blend Medium Roast Single Serve Brew Cups —
0.35 oz., 12 ct.

$3.25

$0.27

26%

26.8%

Victor Allen's Coffee Pumpkin Spice
Medium Roast Single Serve Brew Cups —
0.34 oz., 12 ct.

$4.12

$0.34

Entenmann's Dark Roast Coffee
Single Serve Cups — 0.35 oz., 10 ct.

$6.99

$0.69

23.2%

21.6%

Entenmann's Coffee Pumpkin
Spice Cups — 10 ct./p>

$8.50

$0.85

Coffee-Mate Sweetened Original
Liquid Coffee Creamer — 1.5-liter pump bottle

$24.36

$0.48

18.7%

19%

Coffee-Mate Liquid Creamer, Pumpkin Spice — 1.5-liter pump bottle

$28.98

$0.57

Keurig K-Cups, Green Mountain
Nantucket Blend Coffee — 18 ct.

$10.98

$0.61

8.2%

8.74%

Keurig K-Cups Green Mountain
Pumpkin Spice Coffee — 18 ct.

$11.94

$0.66

Nestle Professional Coffee-Mate
Peppermint Mocha Liquid Coffee Creamer Singles,
Peppermint Mocha Flavor — 0.38 fl. oz. - 50/box

$15.04

$0.30

6.7%

6.3%

Nestle Coffee-Mate Pumpkin Spice
Liquid Coffee Creamer — 50-0.375 fl. oz. tubs

$15.99

$0.32

Oreo Sandwich Cookies — 14.3 oz.

$3.83

$0.27

3.7%

-22.2%

Oreo Sandwich Cookies Pumpkin
Spice — 10.7 oz.

$2.98

$0.28

Pepperidge Farm Milano Milk
Chocolate Cookies — 6 oz. pack

$3.83

$0.64

-14.1%

0.00%

Pepperidge Farm Pumpkin Spice
Milano Cookies — 7 oz.

$3.83

$0.55

Lindt Lindor Hazelnut Milk
Chocolate Truffles — 5.1 oz.

$3.78

$0.74

-16.2%

16.4%

Lindt Lindor Milk Chocolate Truffles
Pumpkin Spice — 5.1 oz.

$3.16

$0.62

Quaker Life Multigrain Cereal,
Vanilla — 18 oz. box

$3.83

$0.21

-19%

-21.7%

Quaker Life Pumpkin Spice
Multigrain Cereal Limited Edition — 18 oz.

$3.00

$0.17

International Delight French Vanilla
Non-Dairy Coffee Creamer Singles — 24 ct. box

$3.28

$0.14

-28.6%

-24.4%

International Delight Pumpkin Pie
Spice Non-Dairy Coffee Creamer Singles — 24 ct. box

$2.48

$0.10

The above items were reviewed online, at Walmart.com, on Sept. 25-26.

The future of pumpkin spice

The latest Nielsen data shows Americans’ taste for all things pumpkin spice is still going strong, but has begun to wane in recent years. Sales of pumpkin-themed consumer goods were up 6.3 percent from July 2016 – July 2017, bringing in $414 million vs. $389.5 million from July 2015 – July 2016. But that was a slower rate of growth than the year prior, when sales grew by 10.8%.

Still, that won’t stop retailers from seizing an opportunity to cash in on the trend while it’s still hot, said food industry analyst and editor of Supermarketguru.com, Phil Lempert.

“A lot of that has to do with the time of year that it is packed and the amount of money that it takes to store those products…which is why at times we are going to see higher prices on those products,” he told MagnifyMoney.

Lempert added that companies have to make up the cost of carrying and storing the additional seasonal items in a warehouse. “You want to get it out there at a fair price but you want to cover your costs otherwise you don’t have a business,” he said.

If you’re determined to get your pumpkin spice kick this year, the longer you wait to buy, the more likely you’ll be able to score a deal. Seasonal items tend to get the steepest price cuts as the season ends and retailers move to clear out their inventory.

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

Brittney Laryea
Brittney Laryea |

Brittney Laryea is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Brittney at [email protected]

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Survey: Americans Fear the Stock Market More Than They Love Retirement

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided or commissioned by any financial institution. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, statements or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and may not have been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities prior to publication.

Gains and losses in the stock market can provoke a wide range of emotional responses, from jumping for joy to falling into a fetal position. But a recent MagnifyMoney survey found 60% of Americans feel anxiety when they think about investing in the market, and that reluctance to embrace investing may be costing them when it comes to retirement savings. Let’s take a look at why Americans dread the stock market and how they can face up to their fears.

Survey says people fear stock market crashes

The biggest reason Americans don’t like the stock market is because they are afraid they’ll lose their money in a market downturn or a crash. Our survey found that almost 61% of Americans hesitate to invest in the stock market because of a potential crash. Not every demographic feels that anxiety equally: Almost 72% of millennials worry about a crash, compared with only 56% of Gen Xers and 55% of baby boomers, despite the fact that the younger millennials have more time to absorb and make up for losses in the market.

Beyond age, gender also plays a role in shaping a person’s investing strategies. Our survey found that 59% of men were willing to accept the risk of losing money in the market if it gave them the possibility of a big windfall, while 58% of women didn’t think the loss of any money was worth investing in the market. Women also worry more about making a mistake with their investment decisions — 63% of women versus 53% of men — and are less likely to have an investment account — 44% of women have accounts versus 60% of men.

According to our survey at MagnifyMoney, more than half of the respondents have an investment account, and most of them (67%) have one thanks to their employer.

Why you need to invest in the stock market

Movies such as The Wolf of Wall Street and The Big Short may give the impression that the stock market is the exclusive playground of the privileged looking to turn their millions into billions. But the modern retirement savings landscape — specifically the shift from companies offering pension plans with guaranteed lifelong income, to employer matches on private investment accounts — makes investing in the stock market a necessity for anyone hoping to retire one day.

“Unless you are a Kardashian or the founder of a tech startup, very few people will be able to save enough money to have a secure financial future without at least some exposure to investments,” said David Rae, a CFP based in Los Angeles.

It’s not a coincidence that Americans who don’t invest in the stock market also lag woefully behind on their retirement savings. Less than half of the country’s women have an investment account, and only 36% of them report feeling on-track with their retirement savings, according to a 2018 study by Prudential. And that sense of falling behind isn’t just a feeling — a separate survey from Student Loan Hero, which like MagnifyMoney, is also owned by LendingTree, found women have saved on average only half as much as men.

Millennials who shun the stock market risk seeing their retirement dreams slip away. A report from the nonprofit National Institute on Retirement Security found that millennials as a whole have “earned about 20% less in wages, are less likely to own a home, and have accumulated about half of the wealth of their parents at the same stage in their lives.” A separate study from MagnifyMoney shows just how far this generation has to go, reporting a median savings of $23,000, instead of the $112,000 many financial experts would recommend.

In short, unless you have a trust fund or a billion-dollar idea, you can’t really afford to ignore the benefits of compound interest granted by investing and just store all of their money away in a deposit account, where inflation will almost certainly eat away most of its purchasing power over time.

How to get over the fear of investing

The thought of investing may cause a sinking feeling in most people’s stomachs, but the following advice should calm your nerves when it comes to putting money to work in the stock market.

Don’t panic when the market does

If your worst fears about the stock market are realized in the form of a recession or crash, one surefire way to make things worse is to dump all your stocks and leave the market. “Sticking to your portfolio, whether times are good or bad, is usually the right choice,” said Rae. “Buying and selling without a plan is a recipe for crappy investment returns.” Fortunately, the MagnifyMoney survey found that almost half (49%) of respondents plan to do nothing if a recession hits.

While it’s good so many people aren’t planning to ghost during a bear market, you could also start thinking of a recession as a chance to snag stocks on the cheap. “A recession is like a big sale on stocks that only comes along every few years,” said Rae. “Look to increase your contributions to your investment accounts, if you can.”

Act your age with your investments

Not only are the young blessed with wrinkle-free skin and all of their hair, but they also have the ability to maximize the return on their investments thanks to the magic of compound interest. Because time is on their side, they can afford to allocate more of their savings in stocks — where risks and rewards are both greater — than in lower-risk, lower-return bond markets, money market accounts, savings accounts or other deposit accounts.

As you get older and wiser, and closer to the big retirement date, you should rethink the makeup of your portfolio, shifting more investments to safer asset classes and away from riskier stocks. This way if the market suffers a downturn, you’re be less exposed to the damage and better able to weather the storm until good times are here again.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help

You may think you need to be rich before you need to hire a financial advisor, but there’s nothing further from the truth. Advisors aren’t free, and even the low-fee ones will charge a commission that ultimately comes from your savings, but the peace of mind and clarity you gain about your investments can be worth the money. One rule of thumb you might consider is to use a robo-advisor if you have less than $100,000 in investable assets, and pony up for a real live human advisor once your investments break six figures.

The time to invest in the market is now

Most Americans don’t like the stock market, but investing is almost a requirement if you want to retire. Fortunately, investing doesn’t have to be so scary and by taking some time to learn the basics, you’ll be well on your way toward celebrating your golden years in financial security.

Methodology

MagnifyMoney by LendingTree commissioned Qualtrics to conduct an online survey of 1,049 Americans, with the sample base proportioned to represent the general population. The survey was fielded May 13-15, 2019. Generations are defined as follows:

  • Millennials are ages 22-37
  • Generation Xers are ages 38-53
  • Baby Boomers are ages 54-72

Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.

James Ellis
James Ellis |

James Ellis is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email James here

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